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Ireland

 folk music sessions
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U2
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George Bernand
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Samuel Beckett

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17

Ireland

L

Lea

116 Followers
 

Englisch

 

11/12/13

Lernzettel

- Unflagging hatred - Murals - Analyzing murals - The Troubles - Belfast Peace Wall - Recent developments

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folk music sessions taking place in many pubs U2 (band) George Bernand Shaw (Fraditional music Scene authors Gaelic Football Samuel Beckett Catholic minority growing demands for equal rights religious & political dimension. huding kish culture 1968-1998 vident political conflicts in Northern keland Football Fraditional Sports The Troubles rugby (international spads unwavering Support Sports 1998 Friday Agreement Fans Ireland unnecessary force used by British army 3,600 people killed Protestant Unionists wished to remain part of the UK. Catholic republicans advocated a unification with the Republican of Ireland Terrorist attacks by the Irish Republican Army & Unionist paramilitary groups Singing songs like the fields of Athenry' Capital of the Republic of Ireland The Great 1 million people died (1845-1852) poor harvest. population 1 million Dublin 1 million people emigrated fall of the population by almost a quarter. at the mouth of the river Liffey. The Republic of Ireland & Northern Ireland. "Celtic. Tiger" European headquarters of many global companies.. Google, Amazon & Microsoft attracted by low corporate taxes To: England & US keland was part of the United. Kingdom (1801-1822) 1922: Britain agreed to grant Ireland astatus, similar to largely independent colonies like Canada Northern Ireland protested and remained Part of the UK Who? drug addicts. Criminal. expelled by paramilitary groups lost generation -> not included into peace process .no stake in society. conservative (great resentment. + against changing world) . unemployed. not well-educated .naive (easily led, pathetic) no cole models masked Protestants UNFLAGGING HATRED Want to be part of UK but. for. just an excuse fed Catholics are taking over unreflected political perspective →> tradition" taken over from parents defiance in the face of shrinking numbers of Protestants feel not represented by political parties recreational...

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riding Catholic · Nationalist views & values imagery /content. •depends on artist / location. | Some by Sands M CARG, REVOLUAR RAOUNT MI Little consequences (rarely hurt, no convidions & short sentences). hard to leave ghettos · just promote peace ・do not contain. defic kish symbols sectarian themes Show Irish culture refer to incidents Consequences? recent transformation: Loyalists historical traditional references guarded figures + Weapons -> intimidating : British Symbols & colors. Why? many controversial pieces removed replaced by ones promoting peace content overpainted but ↳> still controversial parts framed alongside same people get hurt (police). economic consequences. e.g. for tourism. undermine goals of respectable. unionist might lead to radicalization on the other side picture of improved Belfast is marred. Segregation within communities murals that's. definition: large pieces of art- often on walls or on buildings illustrate conflict or contain political themes. Some of the most important public images of our time. Some give tribute to important people. Mandela, Che Guevara bistorical background: . first appeared in early 20th century. (Loyalists) : explosion in 70s180s. additional information: Some by artists or commissioned by political paramilitary groups have become an important tourist attraction 2000 murals.in N.I. L> 7000 in Belfast : notable group: Bogside Artists. (Gallery) THE TROUBLES Background: In 1963, the prime minister of Northern Ireland, Viscount. Brooke borough, stepped down after 20 years in office. The Catholic minority had been politically marginalised -> product of Northern Ireland's two-thirds Protestant majority, but was exacerbated by the drawing of local government electoral boundaries to favour unionist, candidates, even in predominantly Catholic areas like Derry. the right to vote in local govemment elections was restricted to ratepayers (favouring Protestants) with those holding or renting properties in more than one ward recieving more than one vote (maximum of six) unequal allocation of council houses to Protestant families. Catholic areas received less government investment discrimination in daily life, and the refusal of Catholic political reprensentatives in parliament to recognise partition only increased the community's sense of alienation Post-war Britain's new Labour government had introduced the Welfare State to the north, and it was implemented with few, if any, concessions to old sectarian divisions Catholic children in the 1950s could reap the benefits of further and higher education for the first time anti-partition forces had been neutralised and the unionists were firmly in control The Troubles begin:. Viscount Brookeborough was replaced by a former army officer, Terence O'Neill, after adressing the worsening economic malaise L> O'Neill immedially introduced a variety of bold measures to improve the economy → Troubles had begun. a series of radikal moves, represented a serious threat to many unionists, since the Republic's constitution still laid claim to the whole island of Ireland. O'Neill's policies provoked outspoken attacks from within unionism.. With Catholic hopes raised on one side and unionist fears on the other, the situation quickly threatened to boil over. - vidence erupted in 1966. Rioting and disorder was followed in May and June by the murders of two Catholics and a Protestant by a loyalist terror group called the Ulster Volunteer Force -> UVF was immediatly banned Civil Rights: Many Catholics were impatient with the pace of reform and remained unconvinced of the prime minister's sincerity. -> Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association Wicca) in 1967 Nicca called for the end of Seven injustices, ranging from council house allocations to the weighted voling system. Peaceful civil rights marches turned into vident ones in October 1968 • reforms were announced by the Northern Ireland government, including the fairer allocation of council houses and an ambudsman for complaints the reforms failed to deliver one-man-one-vote and the repeal of the repressive Special Powers. Act Civil rights marches continued, first organised by a group called People's Democracy and later by Nicra •RUC response was heavy-handed O'Neill gambled everything on a general election, to try and win a mandate for change from the public. -> failed → O'Neill resigned in April 1969 The Provisional IRA:. -> O'Neill's replacement continued the reforms Paramilitary groups had now begun to operate, on both sides of the secterian divide, while civil rights marches became increasingly prone to confrontation. Civil unrest in Belfast became a three-day explosion of nationalist rioting in Derry government of Northern Ireland was fast loosing its grip on security TRA demanded the unification of Ireland in defiance of Britain and was prepared to use vidence to achieve it - the British government intervened to force the pace of reform. The declaration sought to placate both communities by stating its support for equality and freedom from discrimination, while reasserting that Northern Ireland would remain part of . the UK as long as that was the will of the majority of its people reforms: setting up a variety of bodies to allocate council housing, investigate the recent cycle of vidence and reviewing policing. loyalists responded with more civil unrest & vidence. Attacks on Catholic areas escalated, and many homes were burned the British army tried to control the PIRA. only served to drive more recruits into the ranks of the paramilitaries Dired Rule: In March 1971, Chichester - Clark resigned and was replaced by Brian Faulkner. Unrest in the province had achieved a new level, prompting the new prime minister to reintroduce internment. (detention of suspects without trial) on 9 August 1971 Policing the province was fast becoming an impossible task, and as a result the British Army had adopted increasingly agressive polacies on the ground The events surrounding Bloody Sunday remain the subject of intense controversy. But as a result of the killings, new recruits swelled the ranks of the IRA and yet more British troops were deployed to the province to try and contain the ever-rising tidle of vidence The British government decided to act, removing control of security from the government of Northern Ireland, and appointing a secretary of state for the province. Power-sharing: Amid outpourings of unionist anger following the end of government at Storment the province descended into an abyss of secterian bloodshed Bloody Friday the simultaneous detonation of more than 20 PIRA bambs in Belfast 1 new political initiative new Nothern Ireland assembly, elected by proportional representation, and a government for the region in which Protestants and Catholics would share power. ↳ proposed the creation of a council of Ireland that would give the Republic a role in Nadhern Ireland's affairs. elections in 1873 produced a majority of pro-power sharing representatives Sunningdale Agreement -> raised the possibility that the Republic could gain decision-making powers in Northern Ireland Within two weeks the shutdown had become total, with roadblocks, power-outages and a near complete cessation of industry. The British government seemed unwilling to engage in this new, and potentially crippling confrontation (-- after anti-Sunningdale-agreement unionist candidates won the election) direct rule was seintroduced (lasts for another 25 years) Hunger Strikes:. Over the next decade, a variety of peace initiatives were suggested, tested and ultimately defeated New security policies were also introduced. These included increasing the size of the RUC and UDR while shrinking the army presence, thereby placing emphasis on the people of Northern Ireland policing themselves. 1876. the special category status for paramilitary. prisoners was removed L protests (blanket protest, dicty protest). L> hunger strike in 1980. → called of when the prisoners mistakenly believed. they had been granted concessions L> 1981 second hunger strike -> called of in October, after 10 prisoners died As a result of the strikes, a new strain of bitterness had entered the turmail of Northern Ireland politics. But at the same time, Sands' by-election had shown the potential power of political engagement The Anglo-Irish Agreement: Relations between the Republic of Ireland and Britain had reached a new low during the hunger strikes The rising political effectiveness of Sinn Fein and the danger of interminable vidence if the issue of Northern Ireland remained unresolved. Led Thatcher and her kish counterpart Garret. Fitz Gerald. to reach an agreement ↳> The Anglo-Irish Agreement, signed in November 1985, confirmed that. Northern Ireland would remain independent of the Republic as long as that was the will of the majority in the north. gave the Republic a say in the running of the province. for the first time, with the setting up of the Intergovernmental Conference to discuss security and political issues L₂ power could not be devolved back to Northern Ireland unless it enshrined the principles of power sharing دا L> nationalists welcomed the development and unionists saw it as a step towards abandoning the province to a united keland. By 1987, unicrists had tacitly conceded that their campaign to derail the agreement had failed, and once again began to cooperate with government ministers. The vidence of Northern Ireland's paramilitary groups still had more than a decade to run and the sectarian divide remained as wide as it had ever been. But the agreement constituted an important staging post on the road to the 1998 Good Friday. Agreement, and the eventual, cessation of the cycle of internecine murder and reprisals in the province YCV - Irish civic organisation founded in Belfast. (1812) ↳ for PAF -> young people between 18-25. →not political in the beginning, but joined by unimists. during Troubles attacks against Catholics ANALYZING MURALS Fenian used by Loyalists ↳ claim responsibility for attacks during. Troubles (claim killings of Catholics) first in 1974 -> Ulster - traditional Irish provinces in the north ↳ high percentage of Protestants دا orange order - international Protestant fraternal order, founded by Ulster Protestant 1795 . (nome tribute to King William of Orange) • goal: to defend civil & religious liberties members of secret political organization fighting for independent Ireland. shamrock- national emblem,. St. Patrick's illustration of Trinity Red Hand of Ulster- unicrist paramilitary group. - declared ilegal. after (only) one year in 1973 • red - blood of enemy, denotes the province of Ulster, mostly right hand. BELFAST PEACE WALL description: 30 ft tall stretches about 100s yds . Separates Loyalist and Catholic ghettos Bombay St.- Protestant Cupar Way. mixture of concrete, metal and wire mesh 50 years! : dd - not easy to remove -no cracks newer barriers look like mini gardens -decorations expanded over the years first. make-shift barriers. . Legitimization: people feel safer-would move remaal would not happen easily. gives confort grand as long as peace lines are kept up removing wouldn't help - only make things worse not really peaceful - stones are thrown emotional band. ↳ feeling of security remaal. tension not high enough to make a wall necessary people have to meet & mix to create a new society Symbol of division & hatred → reminder reinforces us vs. them mentality. . no active military groups (-aggression) Originally to keep away armed gunman not · Stone throwing teens

Englisch /

Ireland

Ireland

L

Lea

116 Followers
 

Englisch

 

11/12/13

Lernzettel

Ireland

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 folk music sessions
taking place in many pubs
U2
(band)
George Bernand
Shaw
(Fraditional music
Scene
authors
Gaelic Football
Samuel Beckett

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Teilen

Speichern

17

Kommentare (1)

G

Vielen Dank, wirklich hilfreich für mich, da wir gerade genau das Thema in der Schule haben 😁

- Unflagging hatred - Murals - Analyzing murals - The Troubles - Belfast Peace Wall - Recent developments

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folk music sessions taking place in many pubs U2 (band) George Bernand Shaw (Fraditional music Scene authors Gaelic Football Samuel Beckett Catholic minority growing demands for equal rights religious & political dimension. huding kish culture 1968-1998 vident political conflicts in Northern keland Football Fraditional Sports The Troubles rugby (international spads unwavering Support Sports 1998 Friday Agreement Fans Ireland unnecessary force used by British army 3,600 people killed Protestant Unionists wished to remain part of the UK. Catholic republicans advocated a unification with the Republican of Ireland Terrorist attacks by the Irish Republican Army & Unionist paramilitary groups Singing songs like the fields of Athenry' Capital of the Republic of Ireland The Great 1 million people died (1845-1852) poor harvest. population 1 million Dublin 1 million people emigrated fall of the population by almost a quarter. at the mouth of the river Liffey. The Republic of Ireland & Northern Ireland. "Celtic. Tiger" European headquarters of many global companies.. Google, Amazon & Microsoft attracted by low corporate taxes To: England & US keland was part of the United. Kingdom (1801-1822) 1922: Britain agreed to grant Ireland astatus, similar to largely independent colonies like Canada Northern Ireland protested and remained Part of the UK Who? drug addicts. Criminal. expelled by paramilitary groups lost generation -> not included into peace process .no stake in society. conservative (great resentment. + against changing world) . unemployed. not well-educated .naive (easily led, pathetic) no cole models masked Protestants UNFLAGGING HATRED Want to be part of UK but. for. just an excuse fed Catholics are taking over unreflected political perspective →> tradition" taken over from parents defiance in the face of shrinking numbers of Protestants feel not represented by political parties recreational...

Nichts passendes dabei? Erkunde andere Fachbereiche.

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Gemeinsam lernen

Mit Knowunity erhältest du Lerninhalte von anderen Schüler:innen auf eine moderne und gewohnte Art und Weise, um bestmöglich zu lernen. Schüler:innen teilen ihr Wissen, tauschen sich aus und helfen sich gegenseitig.

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Alternativer Bildtext:

riding Catholic · Nationalist views & values imagery /content. •depends on artist / location. | Some by Sands M CARG, REVOLUAR RAOUNT MI Little consequences (rarely hurt, no convidions & short sentences). hard to leave ghettos · just promote peace ・do not contain. defic kish symbols sectarian themes Show Irish culture refer to incidents Consequences? recent transformation: Loyalists historical traditional references guarded figures + Weapons -> intimidating : British Symbols & colors. Why? many controversial pieces removed replaced by ones promoting peace content overpainted but ↳> still controversial parts framed alongside same people get hurt (police). economic consequences. e.g. for tourism. undermine goals of respectable. unionist might lead to radicalization on the other side picture of improved Belfast is marred. Segregation within communities murals that's. definition: large pieces of art- often on walls or on buildings illustrate conflict or contain political themes. Some of the most important public images of our time. Some give tribute to important people. Mandela, Che Guevara bistorical background: . first appeared in early 20th century. (Loyalists) : explosion in 70s180s. additional information: Some by artists or commissioned by political paramilitary groups have become an important tourist attraction 2000 murals.in N.I. L> 7000 in Belfast : notable group: Bogside Artists. (Gallery) THE TROUBLES Background: In 1963, the prime minister of Northern Ireland, Viscount. Brooke borough, stepped down after 20 years in office. The Catholic minority had been politically marginalised -> product of Northern Ireland's two-thirds Protestant majority, but was exacerbated by the drawing of local government electoral boundaries to favour unionist, candidates, even in predominantly Catholic areas like Derry. the right to vote in local govemment elections was restricted to ratepayers (favouring Protestants) with those holding or renting properties in more than one ward recieving more than one vote (maximum of six) unequal allocation of council houses to Protestant families. Catholic areas received less government investment discrimination in daily life, and the refusal of Catholic political reprensentatives in parliament to recognise partition only increased the community's sense of alienation Post-war Britain's new Labour government had introduced the Welfare State to the north, and it was implemented with few, if any, concessions to old sectarian divisions Catholic children in the 1950s could reap the benefits of further and higher education for the first time anti-partition forces had been neutralised and the unionists were firmly in control The Troubles begin:. Viscount Brookeborough was replaced by a former army officer, Terence O'Neill, after adressing the worsening economic malaise L> O'Neill immedially introduced a variety of bold measures to improve the economy → Troubles had begun. a series of radikal moves, represented a serious threat to many unionists, since the Republic's constitution still laid claim to the whole island of Ireland. O'Neill's policies provoked outspoken attacks from within unionism.. With Catholic hopes raised on one side and unionist fears on the other, the situation quickly threatened to boil over. - vidence erupted in 1966. Rioting and disorder was followed in May and June by the murders of two Catholics and a Protestant by a loyalist terror group called the Ulster Volunteer Force -> UVF was immediatly banned Civil Rights: Many Catholics were impatient with the pace of reform and remained unconvinced of the prime minister's sincerity. -> Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association Wicca) in 1967 Nicca called for the end of Seven injustices, ranging from council house allocations to the weighted voling system. Peaceful civil rights marches turned into vident ones in October 1968 • reforms were announced by the Northern Ireland government, including the fairer allocation of council houses and an ambudsman for complaints the reforms failed to deliver one-man-one-vote and the repeal of the repressive Special Powers. Act Civil rights marches continued, first organised by a group called People's Democracy and later by Nicra •RUC response was heavy-handed O'Neill gambled everything on a general election, to try and win a mandate for change from the public. -> failed → O'Neill resigned in April 1969 The Provisional IRA:. -> O'Neill's replacement continued the reforms Paramilitary groups had now begun to operate, on both sides of the secterian divide, while civil rights marches became increasingly prone to confrontation. Civil unrest in Belfast became a three-day explosion of nationalist rioting in Derry government of Northern Ireland was fast loosing its grip on security TRA demanded the unification of Ireland in defiance of Britain and was prepared to use vidence to achieve it - the British government intervened to force the pace of reform. The declaration sought to placate both communities by stating its support for equality and freedom from discrimination, while reasserting that Northern Ireland would remain part of . the UK as long as that was the will of the majority of its people reforms: setting up a variety of bodies to allocate council housing, investigate the recent cycle of vidence and reviewing policing. loyalists responded with more civil unrest & vidence. Attacks on Catholic areas escalated, and many homes were burned the British army tried to control the PIRA. only served to drive more recruits into the ranks of the paramilitaries Dired Rule: In March 1971, Chichester - Clark resigned and was replaced by Brian Faulkner. Unrest in the province had achieved a new level, prompting the new prime minister to reintroduce internment. (detention of suspects without trial) on 9 August 1971 Policing the province was fast becoming an impossible task, and as a result the British Army had adopted increasingly agressive polacies on the ground The events surrounding Bloody Sunday remain the subject of intense controversy. But as a result of the killings, new recruits swelled the ranks of the IRA and yet more British troops were deployed to the province to try and contain the ever-rising tidle of vidence The British government decided to act, removing control of security from the government of Northern Ireland, and appointing a secretary of state for the province. Power-sharing: Amid outpourings of unionist anger following the end of government at Storment the province descended into an abyss of secterian bloodshed Bloody Friday the simultaneous detonation of more than 20 PIRA bambs in Belfast 1 new political initiative new Nothern Ireland assembly, elected by proportional representation, and a government for the region in which Protestants and Catholics would share power. ↳ proposed the creation of a council of Ireland that would give the Republic a role in Nadhern Ireland's affairs. elections in 1873 produced a majority of pro-power sharing representatives Sunningdale Agreement -> raised the possibility that the Republic could gain decision-making powers in Northern Ireland Within two weeks the shutdown had become total, with roadblocks, power-outages and a near complete cessation of industry. The British government seemed unwilling to engage in this new, and potentially crippling confrontation (-- after anti-Sunningdale-agreement unionist candidates won the election) direct rule was seintroduced (lasts for another 25 years) Hunger Strikes:. Over the next decade, a variety of peace initiatives were suggested, tested and ultimately defeated New security policies were also introduced. These included increasing the size of the RUC and UDR while shrinking the army presence, thereby placing emphasis on the people of Northern Ireland policing themselves. 1876. the special category status for paramilitary. prisoners was removed L protests (blanket protest, dicty protest). L> hunger strike in 1980. → called of when the prisoners mistakenly believed. they had been granted concessions L> 1981 second hunger strike -> called of in October, after 10 prisoners died As a result of the strikes, a new strain of bitterness had entered the turmail of Northern Ireland politics. But at the same time, Sands' by-election had shown the potential power of political engagement The Anglo-Irish Agreement: Relations between the Republic of Ireland and Britain had reached a new low during the hunger strikes The rising political effectiveness of Sinn Fein and the danger of interminable vidence if the issue of Northern Ireland remained unresolved. Led Thatcher and her kish counterpart Garret. Fitz Gerald. to reach an agreement ↳> The Anglo-Irish Agreement, signed in November 1985, confirmed that. Northern Ireland would remain independent of the Republic as long as that was the will of the majority in the north. gave the Republic a say in the running of the province. for the first time, with the setting up of the Intergovernmental Conference to discuss security and political issues L₂ power could not be devolved back to Northern Ireland unless it enshrined the principles of power sharing دا L> nationalists welcomed the development and unionists saw it as a step towards abandoning the province to a united keland. By 1987, unicrists had tacitly conceded that their campaign to derail the agreement had failed, and once again began to cooperate with government ministers. The vidence of Northern Ireland's paramilitary groups still had more than a decade to run and the sectarian divide remained as wide as it had ever been. But the agreement constituted an important staging post on the road to the 1998 Good Friday. Agreement, and the eventual, cessation of the cycle of internecine murder and reprisals in the province YCV - Irish civic organisation founded in Belfast. (1812) ↳ for PAF -> young people between 18-25. →not political in the beginning, but joined by unimists. during Troubles attacks against Catholics ANALYZING MURALS Fenian used by Loyalists ↳ claim responsibility for attacks during. Troubles (claim killings of Catholics) first in 1974 -> Ulster - traditional Irish provinces in the north ↳ high percentage of Protestants دا orange order - international Protestant fraternal order, founded by Ulster Protestant 1795 . (nome tribute to King William of Orange) • goal: to defend civil & religious liberties members of secret political organization fighting for independent Ireland. shamrock- national emblem,. St. Patrick's illustration of Trinity Red Hand of Ulster- unicrist paramilitary group. - declared ilegal. after (only) one year in 1973 • red - blood of enemy, denotes the province of Ulster, mostly right hand. BELFAST PEACE WALL description: 30 ft tall stretches about 100s yds . Separates Loyalist and Catholic ghettos Bombay St.- Protestant Cupar Way. mixture of concrete, metal and wire mesh 50 years! : dd - not easy to remove -no cracks newer barriers look like mini gardens -decorations expanded over the years first. make-shift barriers. . Legitimization: people feel safer-would move remaal would not happen easily. gives confort grand as long as peace lines are kept up removing wouldn't help - only make things worse not really peaceful - stones are thrown emotional band. ↳ feeling of security remaal. tension not high enough to make a wall necessary people have to meet & mix to create a new society Symbol of division & hatred → reminder reinforces us vs. them mentality. . no active military groups (-aggression) Originally to keep away armed gunman not · Stone throwing teens