Englisch /

Nigeria

Nigeria

 Übungs-klausur E LK Q1
Klausurteil A: Leseverstehen und Schreiben integriert
1. Outline the protagonist's encounter with the woman and his

Nigeria

user profile picture

ilayda

22 Followers

Teilen

Speichern

217

 

11

Klausur

probeklausur

Nichts passendes dabei? Erkunde andere Fachbereiche.

Übungs-klausur E LK Q1 Klausurteil A: Leseverstehen und Schreiben integriert 1. Outline the protagonist's encounter with the woman and his reactions to it. (Comprehension) 2. Analyze how social realities in Nigeria are presented. Focus on point of view and use of language. (Analysis) 3.1 Watching the fishermen at work the protagonist remembers W. H. Auden`s lines "Poetry makes nothing happen."(1.39). Based on this statement, evaluate to what extent literature has an impact on political, social and cultural developments. (Evaluation) OR 3.2 Shortly before the woman gets off the bus, the protagonist imagines addressing her (cf. ll. 31-35). Write this monologue in English in which he tells her about his thoughts and feelings about meeting her as a reader on a Nigerian bus. (Re-creation of text) Klausurteil B: Mediation isoliert Your American friend is doing a school project on the reception of African Literature in different countries and would like to know what the situation is like in Germany. Write him/her an email in English in which you explain the problems African literature faces in Germany and how the festival Writing in Migration tries to address them. Materialgrundlage Klausurteil A: Teju Cole: Every Day is for the Thief, (London, 2015), S.41-43 (literarischer Text) Klausurteil B: Stefanie Hirsbrunner: Ghettoisierung, Exotisierung und die Frage nach authentischer Literatur. Braucht Berlin ein afrikanisches Literaturfestival? (http://www.interkontinental.org/de/2018/03/06/deutsch-ghettoisierung- exotisierung-und-die-frage-nach-authentischer-literatur-braucht-berlin-ein-afrikanisches-literaturfestival/) (Textausschnitt,...

Mit uns zu mehr Spaß am Lernen

Hilfe bei den Hausaufgaben

Mit dem Fragen-Feature hast du die Möglichkeit, jederzeit Fragen zu stellen und Antworten von anderen Schüler:innen zu erhalten.

Gemeinsam lernen

Mit Knowunity erhältest du Lerninhalte von anderen Schüler:innen auf eine moderne und gewohnte Art und Weise, um bestmöglich zu lernen. Schüler:innen teilen ihr Wissen, tauschen sich aus und helfen sich gegenseitig.

Sicher und geprüft

Ob Zusammenfassungen, Übungen oder Lernzettel - Knowunity kuratiert alle Inhalte und schafft eine sichere Lernumgebung zu der Ihr Kind jederzeit Zugang hat.

App herunterladen

Alternativer Bildtext:

eine Auslassung) Klausurteil A Teju Cole: Every Day is for the Thief (2007) After several years in New York the narrator has returned to his hometown and is now sitting on a danfo, a local minibus in Lagos. The penultimate passenger to enter the danfo at Ojodu-Berger is a woman in an adire blouse. She holds a large book. The book's dust jacket is off-white, matte. I cannot see her face, though I try to. But, as she sits down, I crane my neck to see what is printed on the book cover, and I catch sight of the author's name. What I see makes my heart leap up into my mouth and thrash about like a catfish in a bucket: Michael Ondaatje2. It was he who had the dream about acrobats in a great house. Now to find a reader of Ondaatje in these circumstances. It is incongruous, and I could hardly be more surprised had she started singing a tune from Des Knaben Wunderhorn³. 1 adire blouse ~ a colourful African blouse 2 Michael Ondaatje ~ Sri Lanka-born, internationally acclaimed Canadian novelist (*1943) 3 Des Knaben Wunderhorn ~ German collection of song lyrics (“Volkslieder”) from the beginning of the 19th century 4 tout ~ person selling bus tickets Of course, Nigerians read. There are the readers of newspapers, such as the gentleman next to me. Magazines of various kinds are popular, as are religious books. But an adult reading a challenging work of literary fiction on Lagos public transportation: that's a sight rare as hen's teeth. The Nigerian literacy rate is low, estimated at fifty- seven percent. But, worse, actual literary habits are inculcated in very few of the so-called literate. I meet only a small number of readers, and those few read tabloids, romance novels by Mills & Boon, or tracts that promise "victorious living" according to certain spiritual principles. It is a hostile environment for the life of the mind. Once we pass the overpass at Ojota, the rush-hour congestion eases. The speed we are gathering on the road means the journey is surprisingly cool. The breeze through the open window is constant. The man next to me folds away his newspaper and begins to nod. Everyone else stares into space. The reader, of whom I can see only scarf and shoulders, reads. Mysterious woman. The condition of the book, from the brief glimpse I have of it, suggests that it is new. Where could she have bought it? Only in two or three of the few bookshops I know of in the city. And if she bought it in Lagos, how much would it have cost her? More than any normal rider of the Lagos public transportation would consider reasonable, that much is certain. Why, then, she on the bus? Because it is what she could afford, or is it because she, too, is an eccentric? The questions come to my mind one after the other, and I cannot untangle them. I hunger for conversation with my secret sharer, about whom, because I know this one thing, I know many things. What, lady, do you make of Ondaatje's labyrinthine sentences, his sensuous prose? How does his intense visuality strike you? But is it hard to concentrate on such poetry in Lagos traffic, with the noise of the crowd, and the tout's4 body odor wafting over you? I see all those gathered here, and I believe in you most. My mind runs a monologue as I watch the back of her head for the duration of the journey. I hope that she will not get off the bus before my stop at CMS, so that I can hop off as she does, walk alongside her, interrogate her. So that I can say to her, with the wild look common to all those who are crazed by overidentification, "We must talk. We have much to say to each other. Let me explain." In the last row of the danfo, I work on my courage. Lagosians are distrustful of strangers, and I have to speak the right words to win her confidence. The bus crosses from Yaba over the Third Mainland Bridge into Lagos Island. In the shadow of skyscrapers, half-nude men in dugoutss cast nets into the lagoon. The work of arms and shoulders. I think of Auden's 6 line: Poetry makes nothing happen. The bus comes to a stop. She disembarks, at Obalende, with her book, and quickly vanishes into the bookless crowd. Just like that, she is gone. Gone, but seared into my mind still. That woman, evanescent 7 as an image made with the lens wide open. 5 dugout ~ small fishing boat 6 W. H. Auden ~ English-American poet (1907 – 1973) 7 evanescent ~ flüchtig Teju Cole's novels are lean, expertly sustained performances. The places he can go, you feel, are just about limitless." Now York Times TEJU COLE EVERY DAY IS FOR THE THIEF By the author of Open City Klausurteil B Stefanie Hirsbrunner: Ghettoisierung, Exotisierung und die Frage nach authentischer Literatur. Braucht Berlin ein afrikanisches Literaturfestival? (Textausschnitt, März 2018) Beim Festival ,,Writing in Migration“ geht es in erster Linie um Menschen in Bewegung. Die Ideen afrikanischer Autor*innen, ihr Wissen und ihre Perspektiven stehen im Mittelpunkt – auch weil sie es sonst eben oft nicht sind. Anders als bei anderen Festivals müssen sie hier keine Fragen zu Grundlagen der Geographie und Gesellschaftsstruktur ihrer Herkunftsländer beantworten und nicht die Handlungen politischer Eliten stellvertretend erklären. Sie müssen nicht für einen ganzen Kontinent oder ein ganzes Genre oder eine ganze Gruppe von Menschen sprechen. Es gibt weder weiße Männer, die als „Afrika-Experten“ sprechen, noch die Frage, unter welchen Umständen das Schreiben als authentisch gelten kann. Das Programm wird explizit von afrikanischer Seite her gestaltet, was die Gesprächsinhalte bei „Writing in Migration“ grundlegend von anderen Literaturevents unterscheiden wird. Durch das Festival generiert InterKontinentals erstmals auch internationale Aufmerksamkeit der führenden Personen, Verlage und Institutionen, die bereits seit Jahren in diesem Bereich tätig sind. London beispielsweise veranstaltet regelmäßig das Festival „Africa Writes". Mit Sharmaine Lovegrove wurde in Großbritannien explizit eine Schwarze Frau im Verlagswesen berufen, sich mit der Repräsentation und der Inklusion von Büchern von Menschen of Color zu befassen und ihre Veröffentlichungen zu befördern. 8 Interkontinental ~ Agentur für afrikanische Literatur im deutschsprachigen Raum mit Sitz in Berlin Viele der im kommenden April präsentierten Autor*innen und deren Bücher sind international gefeiert, in zahlreiche Sprachen übersetzt und vielfach mit den bedeutendsten Literaturpreisen der Welt ausgezeichnet. Es gibt auch deutsche Übersetzungen mancher Werke, aber vergleichsweise wenige oder veraltete. Von den 83 vorgestellten Büchern beim Festival sind gerade einmal 13 übersetzt. Ein Bewusstsein für die Existenz einer geistigen Elite, intellektueller Debatten und hervorragender Kunst, auch in literarischer Form, in allen 54 afrikanischen Ländern lässt sich noch immer mit der Lupe suchen. Piper kann hier als Beispiel dienen. Auch wenn der Verlag in diesem Jahr Ayobami Adebayos Roman „Stay with me“ in deutscher Übersetzung herausbringt, führt er gleichzeitig eine Rubrik Afrika, die dann doch wieder nur unter „Abenteuer und Reiseberichte" ausschließlich weiße stereotype Darstellungen wie zu Hochzeiten der Kolonialromantik präsentiert. Die Mehrheit der Verleger*innen hält scheinbar an dem Mantra fest, Normalität in Bezug auf Afrika ließe sich nicht verkaufen, exotisch müsse es sein und anders“. Wenn ein Roman in der Mittelschicht Ghanas, Kameruns oder Nigerias spielt und die Figuren so sind, wie deutsche Figuren auch, wenn sie vielleicht sogar Ähnliches durchleben, nicht in Hütten, sondern Großstädten leben und der/die Autor*in keine persönliche Leidensgeschichte vorzuweisen hat, die dem Klischee eines Kontinents im 30 Dauerbürgerkrieg entspricht, dann wird das Buch kaum Chancen haben in Deutschland jenseits eines Nischenverlags verlegt zu werden und selbst das ist schwer zu erreichen. Das bedeutet in der Konsequenz, dass sich eine einseitige Darstellung des afrikanischen Kontinents als Ort der Tiere und Savannen und gleichzeitig als Ort des Untergangs in Form von Armut, Flucht, Frauenbeschneidung oder Kindersoldaten in den hiesigen Bücherregalen fortschreibt. Familiengeschichten, historische Romane, Satire, Kriminalromane, Superheldenstories, Liebesgeschichten, Lyrik, Theater etc. all diese Kunstformen werden ignoriert, als gebe es sie gar nicht. [...] Nun haben 36 der führenden Literat*innen mit afrikanischem Bezug für ein dreitägiges Festival zugesagt, das ausschließlich ihre Perspektiven präsentiert, ihr Können respektiert und feiert und zukunftsorientiert deutsche Leser*innen dazu inspirieren möchte, etwas anderes, als Reiseberichte und 40 Liebesschmonzetten mit dem klischeehaften Akazienbaum auf dem Cover zu lesen.

Englisch /

Nigeria

user profile picture

ilayda  

Follow

22 Followers

 Übungs-klausur E LK Q1
Klausurteil A: Leseverstehen und Schreiben integriert
1. Outline the protagonist's encounter with the woman and his

App öffnen

probeklausur

Ähnliche Knows

user profile picture

1

All about Mary Shelly

Know All about Mary Shelly thumbnail

1

 

13

user profile picture

1

10 women who changed history

Know 10 women who changed history  thumbnail

14

 

11/9/10

user profile picture

5

A Streetcar Named Desire

Know A Streetcar Named Desire  thumbnail

131

 

12/13

user profile picture

Hungergames: Foxface

Know Hungergames: Foxface thumbnail

1

 

11/9/10

Übungs-klausur E LK Q1 Klausurteil A: Leseverstehen und Schreiben integriert 1. Outline the protagonist's encounter with the woman and his reactions to it. (Comprehension) 2. Analyze how social realities in Nigeria are presented. Focus on point of view and use of language. (Analysis) 3.1 Watching the fishermen at work the protagonist remembers W. H. Auden`s lines "Poetry makes nothing happen."(1.39). Based on this statement, evaluate to what extent literature has an impact on political, social and cultural developments. (Evaluation) OR 3.2 Shortly before the woman gets off the bus, the protagonist imagines addressing her (cf. ll. 31-35). Write this monologue in English in which he tells her about his thoughts and feelings about meeting her as a reader on a Nigerian bus. (Re-creation of text) Klausurteil B: Mediation isoliert Your American friend is doing a school project on the reception of African Literature in different countries and would like to know what the situation is like in Germany. Write him/her an email in English in which you explain the problems African literature faces in Germany and how the festival Writing in Migration tries to address them. Materialgrundlage Klausurteil A: Teju Cole: Every Day is for the Thief, (London, 2015), S.41-43 (literarischer Text) Klausurteil B: Stefanie Hirsbrunner: Ghettoisierung, Exotisierung und die Frage nach authentischer Literatur. Braucht Berlin ein afrikanisches Literaturfestival? (http://www.interkontinental.org/de/2018/03/06/deutsch-ghettoisierung- exotisierung-und-die-frage-nach-authentischer-literatur-braucht-berlin-ein-afrikanisches-literaturfestival/) (Textausschnitt,...

Nichts passendes dabei? Erkunde andere Fachbereiche.

Mit uns zu mehr Spaß am Lernen

Hilfe bei den Hausaufgaben

Mit dem Fragen-Feature hast du die Möglichkeit, jederzeit Fragen zu stellen und Antworten von anderen Schüler:innen zu erhalten.

Gemeinsam lernen

Mit Knowunity erhältest du Lerninhalte von anderen Schüler:innen auf eine moderne und gewohnte Art und Weise, um bestmöglich zu lernen. Schüler:innen teilen ihr Wissen, tauschen sich aus und helfen sich gegenseitig.

Sicher und geprüft

Ob Zusammenfassungen, Übungen oder Lernzettel - Knowunity kuratiert alle Inhalte und schafft eine sichere Lernumgebung zu der Ihr Kind jederzeit Zugang hat.

App herunterladen

Knowunity

Schule. Endlich einfach.

App öffnen

Alternativer Bildtext:

eine Auslassung) Klausurteil A Teju Cole: Every Day is for the Thief (2007) After several years in New York the narrator has returned to his hometown and is now sitting on a danfo, a local minibus in Lagos. The penultimate passenger to enter the danfo at Ojodu-Berger is a woman in an adire blouse. She holds a large book. The book's dust jacket is off-white, matte. I cannot see her face, though I try to. But, as she sits down, I crane my neck to see what is printed on the book cover, and I catch sight of the author's name. What I see makes my heart leap up into my mouth and thrash about like a catfish in a bucket: Michael Ondaatje2. It was he who had the dream about acrobats in a great house. Now to find a reader of Ondaatje in these circumstances. It is incongruous, and I could hardly be more surprised had she started singing a tune from Des Knaben Wunderhorn³. 1 adire blouse ~ a colourful African blouse 2 Michael Ondaatje ~ Sri Lanka-born, internationally acclaimed Canadian novelist (*1943) 3 Des Knaben Wunderhorn ~ German collection of song lyrics (“Volkslieder”) from the beginning of the 19th century 4 tout ~ person selling bus tickets Of course, Nigerians read. There are the readers of newspapers, such as the gentleman next to me. Magazines of various kinds are popular, as are religious books. But an adult reading a challenging work of literary fiction on Lagos public transportation: that's a sight rare as hen's teeth. The Nigerian literacy rate is low, estimated at fifty- seven percent. But, worse, actual literary habits are inculcated in very few of the so-called literate. I meet only a small number of readers, and those few read tabloids, romance novels by Mills & Boon, or tracts that promise "victorious living" according to certain spiritual principles. It is a hostile environment for the life of the mind. Once we pass the overpass at Ojota, the rush-hour congestion eases. The speed we are gathering on the road means the journey is surprisingly cool. The breeze through the open window is constant. The man next to me folds away his newspaper and begins to nod. Everyone else stares into space. The reader, of whom I can see only scarf and shoulders, reads. Mysterious woman. The condition of the book, from the brief glimpse I have of it, suggests that it is new. Where could she have bought it? Only in two or three of the few bookshops I know of in the city. And if she bought it in Lagos, how much would it have cost her? More than any normal rider of the Lagos public transportation would consider reasonable, that much is certain. Why, then, she on the bus? Because it is what she could afford, or is it because she, too, is an eccentric? The questions come to my mind one after the other, and I cannot untangle them. I hunger for conversation with my secret sharer, about whom, because I know this one thing, I know many things. What, lady, do you make of Ondaatje's labyrinthine sentences, his sensuous prose? How does his intense visuality strike you? But is it hard to concentrate on such poetry in Lagos traffic, with the noise of the crowd, and the tout's4 body odor wafting over you? I see all those gathered here, and I believe in you most. My mind runs a monologue as I watch the back of her head for the duration of the journey. I hope that she will not get off the bus before my stop at CMS, so that I can hop off as she does, walk alongside her, interrogate her. So that I can say to her, with the wild look common to all those who are crazed by overidentification, "We must talk. We have much to say to each other. Let me explain." In the last row of the danfo, I work on my courage. Lagosians are distrustful of strangers, and I have to speak the right words to win her confidence. The bus crosses from Yaba over the Third Mainland Bridge into Lagos Island. In the shadow of skyscrapers, half-nude men in dugoutss cast nets into the lagoon. The work of arms and shoulders. I think of Auden's 6 line: Poetry makes nothing happen. The bus comes to a stop. She disembarks, at Obalende, with her book, and quickly vanishes into the bookless crowd. Just like that, she is gone. Gone, but seared into my mind still. That woman, evanescent 7 as an image made with the lens wide open. 5 dugout ~ small fishing boat 6 W. H. Auden ~ English-American poet (1907 – 1973) 7 evanescent ~ flüchtig Teju Cole's novels are lean, expertly sustained performances. The places he can go, you feel, are just about limitless." Now York Times TEJU COLE EVERY DAY IS FOR THE THIEF By the author of Open City Klausurteil B Stefanie Hirsbrunner: Ghettoisierung, Exotisierung und die Frage nach authentischer Literatur. Braucht Berlin ein afrikanisches Literaturfestival? (Textausschnitt, März 2018) Beim Festival ,,Writing in Migration“ geht es in erster Linie um Menschen in Bewegung. Die Ideen afrikanischer Autor*innen, ihr Wissen und ihre Perspektiven stehen im Mittelpunkt – auch weil sie es sonst eben oft nicht sind. Anders als bei anderen Festivals müssen sie hier keine Fragen zu Grundlagen der Geographie und Gesellschaftsstruktur ihrer Herkunftsländer beantworten und nicht die Handlungen politischer Eliten stellvertretend erklären. Sie müssen nicht für einen ganzen Kontinent oder ein ganzes Genre oder eine ganze Gruppe von Menschen sprechen. Es gibt weder weiße Männer, die als „Afrika-Experten“ sprechen, noch die Frage, unter welchen Umständen das Schreiben als authentisch gelten kann. Das Programm wird explizit von afrikanischer Seite her gestaltet, was die Gesprächsinhalte bei „Writing in Migration“ grundlegend von anderen Literaturevents unterscheiden wird. Durch das Festival generiert InterKontinentals erstmals auch internationale Aufmerksamkeit der führenden Personen, Verlage und Institutionen, die bereits seit Jahren in diesem Bereich tätig sind. London beispielsweise veranstaltet regelmäßig das Festival „Africa Writes". Mit Sharmaine Lovegrove wurde in Großbritannien explizit eine Schwarze Frau im Verlagswesen berufen, sich mit der Repräsentation und der Inklusion von Büchern von Menschen of Color zu befassen und ihre Veröffentlichungen zu befördern. 8 Interkontinental ~ Agentur für afrikanische Literatur im deutschsprachigen Raum mit Sitz in Berlin Viele der im kommenden April präsentierten Autor*innen und deren Bücher sind international gefeiert, in zahlreiche Sprachen übersetzt und vielfach mit den bedeutendsten Literaturpreisen der Welt ausgezeichnet. Es gibt auch deutsche Übersetzungen mancher Werke, aber vergleichsweise wenige oder veraltete. Von den 83 vorgestellten Büchern beim Festival sind gerade einmal 13 übersetzt. Ein Bewusstsein für die Existenz einer geistigen Elite, intellektueller Debatten und hervorragender Kunst, auch in literarischer Form, in allen 54 afrikanischen Ländern lässt sich noch immer mit der Lupe suchen. Piper kann hier als Beispiel dienen. Auch wenn der Verlag in diesem Jahr Ayobami Adebayos Roman „Stay with me“ in deutscher Übersetzung herausbringt, führt er gleichzeitig eine Rubrik Afrika, die dann doch wieder nur unter „Abenteuer und Reiseberichte" ausschließlich weiße stereotype Darstellungen wie zu Hochzeiten der Kolonialromantik präsentiert. Die Mehrheit der Verleger*innen hält scheinbar an dem Mantra fest, Normalität in Bezug auf Afrika ließe sich nicht verkaufen, exotisch müsse es sein und anders“. Wenn ein Roman in der Mittelschicht Ghanas, Kameruns oder Nigerias spielt und die Figuren so sind, wie deutsche Figuren auch, wenn sie vielleicht sogar Ähnliches durchleben, nicht in Hütten, sondern Großstädten leben und der/die Autor*in keine persönliche Leidensgeschichte vorzuweisen hat, die dem Klischee eines Kontinents im 30 Dauerbürgerkrieg entspricht, dann wird das Buch kaum Chancen haben in Deutschland jenseits eines Nischenverlags verlegt zu werden und selbst das ist schwer zu erreichen. Das bedeutet in der Konsequenz, dass sich eine einseitige Darstellung des afrikanischen Kontinents als Ort der Tiere und Savannen und gleichzeitig als Ort des Untergangs in Form von Armut, Flucht, Frauenbeschneidung oder Kindersoldaten in den hiesigen Bücherregalen fortschreibt. Familiengeschichten, historische Romane, Satire, Kriminalromane, Superheldenstories, Liebesgeschichten, Lyrik, Theater etc. all diese Kunstformen werden ignoriert, als gebe es sie gar nicht. [...] Nun haben 36 der führenden Literat*innen mit afrikanischem Bezug für ein dreitägiges Festival zugesagt, das ausschließlich ihre Perspektiven präsentiert, ihr Können respektiert und feiert und zukunftsorientiert deutsche Leser*innen dazu inspirieren möchte, etwas anderes, als Reiseberichte und 40 Liebesschmonzetten mit dem klischeehaften Akazienbaum auf dem Cover zu lesen.