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Exam - migration, sense of belonging, meaning of home

Exam - migration, sense of belonging, meaning of home

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Patrizia

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Klausur

Exam - migration, sense of belonging, meaning of home

 Name: Patrizia Volk
Material:
English exam no. 1 (course EN12.1)
Extract from: Gary Younge: "As Migrants we leave home in search for a futu

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Nicht meine beste Leistung, aber ich denke trotzdem sehr hilfreich, vorallem weil der Erwartungshorizont anbei ist.

Nichts passendes dabei? Erkunde andere Fachbereiche.

Name: Patrizia Volk Material: English exam no. 1 (course EN12.1) Extract from: Gary Younge: "As Migrants we leave home in search for a future, but we lose the past", The Guardian, 24 March 2015 10 Date: 14.01.21 This is not a sob story. But the tears came anyhow. They crept up on me at the 70th birthday party of a friend a few years back. We were celebrating in a hotel ballroom in Letchworth in Hertfordshire and I had struck up a conversation with [a] distant acquaintance - a woman 5 I had met only a few times before and have not met since. We talked about the primary school she worked at and the secondary school I went to [...]. She asked me when I was going back to New York, where I'd been living for seven years at that point, and I told her, the next afternoon. 25 You're so lucky,' she said. 'You've done so well for yourself. Your mum would be so proud.. And that was when my eyes started welling up. Now it could have been any number of triggers - alcohol, jet lag or the mention of my mother, who died decades ago. But what really upset me was realising 15 that in this town, people I wasn't even particularly close to knew me in a...

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way that nobody else would. They knew place names that no one else in my regular life (apart from my brothers) knew. And yes, they not only knew my mother but they knew me when I had a mother. The following day I would fly to a place where people knew a version 20 of me where very little of any of this applied. My friends in New York knew I had brothers and had lost my mother. They knew I grew up working class in a town near London. The rest was footnotes - too much information for transient people, including myself who would soon move to Chicago, who were travelling light. In short, I cried for bits of my life that had been lost. Not discarded; but atrophied. Huge, formative parts of my childhood and youth that I could no longer explain because you would really have had to have been there but without which I didn't make much sense. Migration involves loss. Even when you're privileged, as I am, and 30 move of your own free will, as I did, you feel it. Migrants, almost by definition, move with the future in mind. But their journeys inevitably involve excising part of their past. It's not workers who emigrate but people. And whenever they move they leave part of themselves behind. Efforts to reclaim that which has been lost result in something more 35 than nostalgia but, if you're lucky, less than exile. And the losses keep coming. Funerals, christenings, graduations and weddings missed milestones you couldn't make because your life is elsewhere. If you're not lucky then your departure was forced by poverty, war or environmental disaster- or all three - and your destination is not of 40 your choosing but merely where you could get to or where you were put. In that case the loss is bound to be all the more keen and painful. [...] You may have to leave behind your partner, your kids and your 1 sob story ['spb]: sad story intended to make you cry 4 strike up a conversation (with sb.) (struck, struck): begin a conversation (with sb.) 10 do well for yourself (infml): be successful 13 trigger (n); Ausloser 23 transient ['trænziont]: constantly moving 25 discard sth. (fml): throw sth. away 26 atrophy [ætrafi] (v, fml): verkümmern 26 formative ['fomativ]: nachhaltig prägend 30-31 by definition: (here) wie es sich im Wort „Migrant" ausdrückt; wie schon die Bezeichnung „Migrant" besagt 32 excise sth. [ik'saiz] (fml): remove sth. 36 christening ['krisnm): Taufe 41 keen: deep Patrizia Volk home. In time, in order to survive, you may have to let go of your language, your religion and your sense of self. [...] I was lucky. I come from a travelling people. Those from an island as small as Barbados, buffeted by the winds of global economics and politics, tend to go where the work is. My great-grandfather helped build the Panama Canal. My parents came to England from Barbados in the early sixties. Of my 14 aunts and uncles nine left the island for 50 significant periods of time. I have cousins in Canada, Britain, the US and the Caribbean, some of whom I've never met. [...] 45 I fell in love with an American and here we are. My sense of loss is primarily cultural. Tapping a football to my son in the park and watching him pick it up ('Kick it! Kick it!' I'd implore); asking why there's an armed ss policeman in his elementary school ('It's a good question,' said my wife. But that's not particularly remarkable here'); seeing nieces and nephews grow up on Facebook; returning for a holiday to find all the teenagers you know wearing onesies and using catchphrases from shows you've never heard of; seeing or hearing something that reminds 60 you of home, your first home, and realising you lack too many common reference points to share it with those with whom you share your life now. Migration is a good thing, so long as it is voluntary. I believe in the free movement of people. But that's not to say it doesn't have a price. 65 I have choices that most of the world's migrants don't have. I can go back. And I'm happy where I am, This is not a sob story. But every now and then, when I least expect them, the tears come anyhow. 46 buffet sb./sth. ['bafit]: hit sb./sth. price= stuch deiner Identität 54 implore: flehentlich bitten 56 remarkable: unusual 58 onesie [wanzi]: jumpsuit 59 show: (here) TV show Assignments: 1. Outline the different meanings of identity as explained by Younge in his essay. 2. Explain what Younge means when he writes that migration always comes at a price (cf. ll. 63f.). 3. Comment on Younge's view, referring to material dealt with in class. hinter dir lagen (Sprache, Kultur) Best of luck!! Ⓒ comment: - same opinion as Younge -1. voluntory Migration is good -2. new country becomes your home (after time) first -3. it needs effort and Loss -4. a gen..... Patrizia Volk, Klasse 12 Exam 1 No. 2 When someone someone migrates migrates to another country he must be aware of the fact that he will loose a part of W something his identity and that is that must happen to fully integrate. It doesn't matter if leave home land. your will or because you you. flee to survive. When in a new of time of free you integrate country you will learn language, take over their a new customs and traditions and find your have to new friends who are may be the citizens. By practicing traditions of your new culture you will automatically stop prac- ticing the customs of homeland. you your new the customs of common your After a certain will accept the culture country and leave native your behind because you Bez. R S.O. 14.01.21 country last the connection to it Another price that comes with migration, besides lodsing a W (soi). √15-(Introduction) Av-(Shil) 3+ [language/ culture) Av-ts J- (Unklar) 3+ (family) J+ (events) Aut 3+ (Uulerschied d. len v. Migration, wenn auch sehr whinterhergeschoben") J (Textbezug? Zn Lage) W part of your identity, is loosing the connection to the family that stayed in your country of origin. not attendig at family reunions like funerals, weddings, birthdays and graduations. you have the same experiencebre will not as your family has and will you also not share the memories with GM) them. Such memories creates feelings of love and belonging that keep a family together. If don't have these memories will loose the connection to RW By W you you the rest of will your family. Of course be welcome at you always be family reunions but there will a sense of displacement. R/G Although these are commenty Gr prices that have to be payed by migrants who migrated on their free will, there are also pay prices that refugees have to For example leaving behind their family and friends in a dangerous. country or doing terrible things. in order to survive. 2² No. 1 In the extract of the essay "As Migrants we leave home future, but we in search for a lose the past" by Gary Young, published in "The Gourdian" on the 24th of March 2015 the author mentions two different neanings of identity. The first form of identity is the one that developes in childhood. This your identity is formed by your education, your hometown, the cultur of R R your country of origin, it customs and traditions. Once Gr leave home and travel your country, this part of your identity gets lost. You are developing the second form of identity. This identity is influenced by your new new country you are now living in the people that live there and the new customs and tra- ditions. The second identity is nostly not known by your family homeland which is your why migrants often loose the connection to this part of their family. you to a new W W J J+ (People) 가 >* (Tandsli culture)

Englisch /

Exam - migration, sense of belonging, meaning of home

Exam - migration, sense of belonging, meaning of home

user profile picture

Patrizia

46 Followers
 

Englisch

 

12

Klausur

Exam - migration, sense of belonging, meaning of home

Dieser Inhalt ist nur in der Knowunity App verfügbar.

 Name: Patrizia Volk
Material:
English exam no. 1 (course EN12.1)
Extract from: Gary Younge: "As Migrants we leave home in search for a futu

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30

Kommentare (1)

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Vielen Dank, wirklich hilfreich für mich, da wir gerade genau das Thema in der Schule haben 😁

Nicht meine beste Leistung, aber ich denke trotzdem sehr hilfreich, vorallem weil der Erwartungshorizont anbei ist.

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Name: Patrizia Volk Material: English exam no. 1 (course EN12.1) Extract from: Gary Younge: "As Migrants we leave home in search for a future, but we lose the past", The Guardian, 24 March 2015 10 Date: 14.01.21 This is not a sob story. But the tears came anyhow. They crept up on me at the 70th birthday party of a friend a few years back. We were celebrating in a hotel ballroom in Letchworth in Hertfordshire and I had struck up a conversation with [a] distant acquaintance - a woman 5 I had met only a few times before and have not met since. We talked about the primary school she worked at and the secondary school I went to [...]. She asked me when I was going back to New York, where I'd been living for seven years at that point, and I told her, the next afternoon. 25 You're so lucky,' she said. 'You've done so well for yourself. Your mum would be so proud.. And that was when my eyes started welling up. Now it could have been any number of triggers - alcohol, jet lag or the mention of my mother, who died decades ago. But what really upset me was realising 15 that in this town, people I wasn't even particularly close to knew me in a...

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way that nobody else would. They knew place names that no one else in my regular life (apart from my brothers) knew. And yes, they not only knew my mother but they knew me when I had a mother. The following day I would fly to a place where people knew a version 20 of me where very little of any of this applied. My friends in New York knew I had brothers and had lost my mother. They knew I grew up working class in a town near London. The rest was footnotes - too much information for transient people, including myself who would soon move to Chicago, who were travelling light. In short, I cried for bits of my life that had been lost. Not discarded; but atrophied. Huge, formative parts of my childhood and youth that I could no longer explain because you would really have had to have been there but without which I didn't make much sense. Migration involves loss. Even when you're privileged, as I am, and 30 move of your own free will, as I did, you feel it. Migrants, almost by definition, move with the future in mind. But their journeys inevitably involve excising part of their past. It's not workers who emigrate but people. And whenever they move they leave part of themselves behind. Efforts to reclaim that which has been lost result in something more 35 than nostalgia but, if you're lucky, less than exile. And the losses keep coming. Funerals, christenings, graduations and weddings missed milestones you couldn't make because your life is elsewhere. If you're not lucky then your departure was forced by poverty, war or environmental disaster- or all three - and your destination is not of 40 your choosing but merely where you could get to or where you were put. In that case the loss is bound to be all the more keen and painful. [...] You may have to leave behind your partner, your kids and your 1 sob story ['spb]: sad story intended to make you cry 4 strike up a conversation (with sb.) (struck, struck): begin a conversation (with sb.) 10 do well for yourself (infml): be successful 13 trigger (n); Ausloser 23 transient ['trænziont]: constantly moving 25 discard sth. (fml): throw sth. away 26 atrophy [ætrafi] (v, fml): verkümmern 26 formative ['fomativ]: nachhaltig prägend 30-31 by definition: (here) wie es sich im Wort „Migrant" ausdrückt; wie schon die Bezeichnung „Migrant" besagt 32 excise sth. [ik'saiz] (fml): remove sth. 36 christening ['krisnm): Taufe 41 keen: deep Patrizia Volk home. In time, in order to survive, you may have to let go of your language, your religion and your sense of self. [...] I was lucky. I come from a travelling people. Those from an island as small as Barbados, buffeted by the winds of global economics and politics, tend to go where the work is. My great-grandfather helped build the Panama Canal. My parents came to England from Barbados in the early sixties. Of my 14 aunts and uncles nine left the island for 50 significant periods of time. I have cousins in Canada, Britain, the US and the Caribbean, some of whom I've never met. [...] 45 I fell in love with an American and here we are. My sense of loss is primarily cultural. Tapping a football to my son in the park and watching him pick it up ('Kick it! Kick it!' I'd implore); asking why there's an armed ss policeman in his elementary school ('It's a good question,' said my wife. But that's not particularly remarkable here'); seeing nieces and nephews grow up on Facebook; returning for a holiday to find all the teenagers you know wearing onesies and using catchphrases from shows you've never heard of; seeing or hearing something that reminds 60 you of home, your first home, and realising you lack too many common reference points to share it with those with whom you share your life now. Migration is a good thing, so long as it is voluntary. I believe in the free movement of people. But that's not to say it doesn't have a price. 65 I have choices that most of the world's migrants don't have. I can go back. And I'm happy where I am, This is not a sob story. But every now and then, when I least expect them, the tears come anyhow. 46 buffet sb./sth. ['bafit]: hit sb./sth. price= stuch deiner Identität 54 implore: flehentlich bitten 56 remarkable: unusual 58 onesie [wanzi]: jumpsuit 59 show: (here) TV show Assignments: 1. Outline the different meanings of identity as explained by Younge in his essay. 2. Explain what Younge means when he writes that migration always comes at a price (cf. ll. 63f.). 3. Comment on Younge's view, referring to material dealt with in class. hinter dir lagen (Sprache, Kultur) Best of luck!! Ⓒ comment: - same opinion as Younge -1. voluntory Migration is good -2. new country becomes your home (after time) first -3. it needs effort and Loss -4. a gen..... Patrizia Volk, Klasse 12 Exam 1 No. 2 When someone someone migrates migrates to another country he must be aware of the fact that he will loose a part of W something his identity and that is that must happen to fully integrate. It doesn't matter if leave home land. your will or because you you. flee to survive. When in a new of time of free you integrate country you will learn language, take over their a new customs and traditions and find your have to new friends who are may be the citizens. By practicing traditions of your new culture you will automatically stop prac- ticing the customs of homeland. you your new the customs of common your After a certain will accept the culture country and leave native your behind because you Bez. R S.O. 14.01.21 country last the connection to it Another price that comes with migration, besides lodsing a W (soi). √15-(Introduction) Av-(Shil) 3+ [language/ culture) Av-ts J- (Unklar) 3+ (family) J+ (events) Aut 3+ (Uulerschied d. len v. Migration, wenn auch sehr whinterhergeschoben") J (Textbezug? Zn Lage) W part of your identity, is loosing the connection to the family that stayed in your country of origin. not attendig at family reunions like funerals, weddings, birthdays and graduations. you have the same experiencebre will not as your family has and will you also not share the memories with GM) them. Such memories creates feelings of love and belonging that keep a family together. If don't have these memories will loose the connection to RW By W you you the rest of will your family. Of course be welcome at you always be family reunions but there will a sense of displacement. R/G Although these are commenty Gr prices that have to be payed by migrants who migrated on their free will, there are also pay prices that refugees have to For example leaving behind their family and friends in a dangerous. country or doing terrible things. in order to survive. 2² No. 1 In the extract of the essay "As Migrants we leave home future, but we in search for a lose the past" by Gary Young, published in "The Gourdian" on the 24th of March 2015 the author mentions two different neanings of identity. The first form of identity is the one that developes in childhood. This your identity is formed by your education, your hometown, the cultur of R R your country of origin, it customs and traditions. Once Gr leave home and travel your country, this part of your identity gets lost. You are developing the second form of identity. This identity is influenced by your new new country you are now living in the people that live there and the new customs and tra- ditions. The second identity is nostly not known by your family homeland which is your why migrants often loose the connection to this part of their family. you to a new W W J J+ (People) 가 >* (Tandsli culture)