Englisch /

Gran Torino

Gran Torino

 Inhalt
The film ,,Gran Torino" is an American drama film and was directed and produced by Clint Eastwood. The film is about an old man who'

Kommentare (3)

Teilen

Speichern

265

Gran Torino

H

Helena

48 Followers
 

Englisch

 

11/12/13

Lernzettel

• Abitur-Zusammenfassung

Nichts passendes dabei? Erkunde andere Fachbereiche.

Inhalt The film ,,Gran Torino" is an American drama film and was directed and produced by Clint Eastwood. The film is about an old man who's called Walt Kowalski and a boy who lives next to him, who's called Thao. Kowalski is a recently widowed Korean War veteran, alienated from his family and world. Walt's young neighbour Thao Vang Lor is pressured by his cousin into trying to steal Walt's car, for his initiation into his cousin's gang. However, Walt catches him and builds up a relationship with Thao and his family. Gran Torino Narrative structure A Hollywood drama Despite its complex sign system, the movie Gran Torino can be interpreted as a text with a narrative structure ● • With its clear sequence of the introduction of the situation, its disruption and resolution, Gran Torino strongly fits in with the drama genre The linear story is told through Walt Kowalski's eyes • The plot focuses on Walt's development and his friendship to Thao and his family. One major subplot, however, is the veteran's relation to Father Janovich ● Suspense culminates in chapter 28. The viewers' expectations of a showdown as a resolution of the conflict are contradicted, as the movie ends in the anticlimax.of Walt's death Two funerals frame the plot Setting • Highland Park - a troubled spot in Motor...

Mit uns zu mehr Spaß am Lernen

Hilfe bei den Hausaufgaben

Mit dem Fragen-Feature hast du die Möglichkeit, jederzeit Fragen zu stellen und Antworten von anderen Schüler:innen zu erhalten.

Gemeinsam lernen

Mit Knowunity erhältest du Lerninhalte von anderen Schüler:innen auf eine moderne und gewohnte Art und Weise, um bestmöglich zu lernen. Schüler:innen teilen ihr Wissen, tauschen sich aus und helfen sich gegenseitig.

Sicher und geprüft

Ob Zusammenfassungen, Übungen oder Lernzettel - Knowunity kuratiert alle Inhalte und schafft eine sichere Lernumgebung zu der Ihr Kind jederzeit Zugang hat.

App herunterladen

Alternativer Bildtext:

City Detroit • Gran Torino is set in Highland Park, Michigan, which belongs to the Metro politan area of Detroit Throughout its history, the city has been connected with the local factories of Ford, Chrysler and General Motors • Metropolitan Detroit was particularly hit by the 2008 financial crisis, in the middle of which the movie was released ● • Once a booming city, Highland Park is now part of "that industrial graveyard called Detroit" (Dargis 2008). Characters Walt Kowalski • A racist who turns out to have a good heart • With respect to his values, Walt is "still living in the '50s." conservatism, patriotism and racial prejudices make American of that generation • He worked at Ford for his entire life • His him a typical white He is haunted by his Korean War experiences, in particular by his killing innocent people • In Walt's racist worldview, he does not distinguish between different Asian ethnic groups. For him, they are all alike. Thus his Hmong neighbors remind him of his bad conscience • With his 78 years, he is, so to speak, an outdated old timer like his vintage car, the Gran Torino, alienated from the changing world around him • He is also alienated from his two sons and their families and portrayed as a grumpy loner • His behavior is stereotypically masculine, e.g. solving problems on his own, protecting or defending himself and others with a gun and not going to the doctor • He becomes a male role model for Thao • Walt's getting into touch with his Hmong neighbors changes him. He has to learn that he has got more in common with his Hmong neighbors than with his own family. Walt realizes that he is responsible for the escalation of violence Sacrificing himself in the confrontation with the Hmong gangbangers, he finally finds peace as he takes the chance to atone for his lifelong guilt Thao and the Hmong Community The girls go to college, and the boys go to jail •The Hmong are a forgotten people, scattered over Laos, Thailand and Vietnam. They fought for the Americans in the Vietnam War after which they had to go into U.S. exile. ● • Most Hmong girls are able to adapt to American society, while the boys do not accept their fathers' values. Having no orientation, some of them get criminal Thao Vang Lor, a 16-year-old teenager, grows up in a female-dominated house without any male role model • He lacks self-confidence. Torn between gender roles, Hmong traditions and American standards of living, he does not know where he belongs to and searches for an identity • Easy to push around, he is pressurized into joining the Hmong gang. After his initiation ritual of stealing the Gran Torino failed, he wants to keep a distance, so the gangbangers try to take him by force • As compensation for his attempted theft Thao has to do odd jobs for Walt Kowalski. For the first time in his life he really rises to the tasks presented to him. • Being taught to talk and behave like a man, he grows from a teenager into a male adult. • He first accepts the gangbangers' brutality and does not want Walt to do anything against it. Only after Sue's rape he is willing to kill them. However, he is locked up in the basement of Walt's house, because Walt wants to prevent him from getting blood on his hands ● To his own surprise, he inherits Walt's Gran Torino, giving him the opportunity to assimilate into American society Sue is a strong young woman, able to live in both worlds of Hmong tradition and modern western liberalism. One sign for this is that she has a white boyfriend • Due to her self-confidence she does not shy away from any open confrontation with the Hmong gang or the African American men • Sue bridges the gap between her family and Walt Kowalski. Without her, they would not have become friends. Her grandmother Phong is a first-generation immigrant, full of prejudices against white America. She does not speak English • Spider (Sue's and Thao's cousin), Smokie and the other Hmong gangbangers terrorize the neighborhood. There is no resistance against them within the community. People do not dare to talk to the police • The peer group follows its own rules of enforcing their status by violence and retaliation. • Being witriessed when shooting the unarmed Walt, they are arrested ● Father Janovich • An inexperienced "over-educated, 27-year-old virgin" learns about life and death The Catholic Irishman delivers an impersonal eulogy for Dorothy Kowalski. He tries very hard to remove the veteran's wall of bitterness and shame, but for a long time he does not get through him • Walt's direct way of telling him his opinion and his hidden war experiences change Father Janovich's outlook on life It is quite a step for him to show some understanding for Thao's wish to kill the gangbangers After Walt's confession, Father Janovich calls the police to prevent the almost inevitable shootout •. In the sermon at Walt's funeral he publicly acknowledges Walt Kowalski's influence on him ● Themes Racism in a Multicultural Society "Hope for a Racist, and Maybe a Country" (Dargis) • Gran Torino questions the ideal of white America • The movie shows a racially segregated society. Despite its frequent racial slurs, Gran Torino has a strong anti-racist message • Nevertheless, the movie has also been criticized for confirming racial stereotypes Concepts of Masculinity Guns, cars, girls and a tough language ● • Walt Kowalski's characterization corresponds to the traditional definitions of masculinity • He went to war and possesses two guns He worked at Ford and has two cars: a pickup truck and the Gran Torino. He married and raised a family with two sons • Walt drinks a lot and is a chain-smoker • His language is vulgar and commanding • In contrast to Walt, Thao Vang Lor is bossed around by his sister and does women's work • Other Hmong teenagers are gangbangers, rebelling against their culture and their fathers' way of life With Walt's help, Thao is manned up: He is taught to talk like a man and starts dating You • He gets a job in construction, a field considered to be typically male When the Gran Torino is passed over to him, his assimilation to American society is completed Guilt and Redemption • Walt's twofold guilt. In the Korean War Walt killed about 13 people • He is particularly haunted by his murdering an innocent Korean teenager • More than 50 years later he is responsible for the escalation of violence in his neighborhood, including Sue's rape • He tries to atone for his twofold guilt by sacrificing himself • His redemption is expressed by the symbol of the cross when he is shot down (Gun) Violence •The right to bear arms • The Second Amendment to the Constitution grants every citizen the right to It is a hotly disputed issue in the United States • Walt Kowalski has at least two guns: his M1 Grand Rifle from the Korean War bear arms. and a pistol. He does not hesitate to take them in order to scare the gang bangers away • The Latino and Hmong gangs use their guns for enforcing dominance or com mitting crimes • Gran Torino is an example of the dynamics of violence and the acceleration of . reprisals Generation Gaps • Materialistic interests vs. social values • Walt and Mitch Kowalski do not only differ in their physical appearance, but also in their mentalities. Mitch is a typical representative of the post-war generation whose capitalist ideas are questioned and criticized. • The sons do not have time for their father •The relationship between Walt and his grandchildren seems to be even worse. In particular his granddaughter Ashley shows no respect for him • In contrast to Walt's grandchildren, Thao and Sue look up to him. They are similar to him in that they appreciate traditions and social ties • For Thao, Walt becomes a mentor or teacher and a bit of a father. • Young Father Janovich also learns a lot about life and death from the Korean War veteran The Ambiguity of Belonging • Cultural and social identity problems • Thao is torn between his Hmong traditions and his wish to assimilate into American society. All people around him emphasize Thao's female character traits and behavior. He searches for a clear male identity. • Having resisted the overall white flight, Walt lives alone amidst a Hmong dominated community in which he does not fit. • He recognizes that he has more in common with his Hmong neighbors than with his own family. • Walt is also "alienated from himself" (Ulmer 2017, p. 52) Symbols and Motifs Symbols and Motifs ● The Gran Torino and the motif of life and death dominate the movie • The Gran Torino fits to Walt Kowalski's personality as it expresses his masculinity • It is a necessary part in Thao's process of becoming a man • The vintage car bridges the gap between Walt and Thao. It is a symbol of the family connection between them. The mirror stands for Walt's moments of introspection • The lighter is a reminder of Walt's guilt • Life and death, the main motif of the movie, are juxtaposed. Death is present and foreshadowed throughout the movie by the two funerals, Walt's smoking, his coughing up blood and the final shootout • The movie plays with gender stereotypes Cinematic Devices Camera • Point of view, dominance and intense emotions • The camera supports the fact that the story is told through Walt's eyes • Eastwood uses the high- and low-angle camera positions to indicate dominance or hierarchy; eye-level shots symbolize the equality of characters Close-ups are used in moments of intense emotions Long shots or establishing shots introduce a new setting • In dramatic scenes the director chooses a hand-held camera • Walt's death is filmed in slow motion ● • Dissolves are used to underline the connection between two scenes or. to indicate a change of location or the passing of time Structure FDZER A L U N ,,Get off my lawn" initiation ritual of stealing the 1972 Ford Gran Torino rivaling gangs; Thao and the Hispanic gang Walt's family problems Music and Lighting Cultural and atmospheric indicators The melancholy title song "Gran Torino" picks up the main motifs of the movie such as the ambiguity of belonging, war scars, loneliness and disappointed dreams • Drum sounds are frequent signals for dramatic tension. They indicate that Walt Kowalski is in his "war-mode" • The Latino and the Hmong gangs listen to music which reflects their own cultural background Low-key lighting corresponds to the melancholy atmosphere of the movie • The bright daylight in the final scene supports the positive message of the movie. ● Sue 's harassment by the African Americans drive-by shooting; Sue 's rape Walt's death Walt's last will FUNERAL F Setting 1. Highland Park until the 1960s a prestigious, white, middle-class neighborhood • inhabited by car plant workers with the same cultural backround Walt Kowalski in 2008 a multicultural community in reality with over 90% African Americans 3. Charlevoix St., Detroit • in the movie a Hmong dominated, run-down neighborhood Locations within Metro Detroit • symbolizes African-American "territory" • bad reputation for its crime rate • Walt as the only white man left conservative values: hanging on to the past patriotism importance of family • respect towards the old ● racial prejudices against Asians ● ● ● White flight Locations within Metro Detroit Hmong neighbors than with his own family develops a kinship to wards Thao and Sue ● 2. Rich residential districts (cf. Mitch Kowalski's house) • Eastwood's intention: ghetto look and pictures of decay Walt is still haunted by his Korean War (1950-1953) memories: he killed at least 13 men, including one innocent teenager ↓ manly behavior: ● • background: financial crisis 2008 which hit Motor City Detroit very hard At the beginning of the movie Walt is shown as a grumpy old man alienated from his family. He does not belong to the changed neighborhood / modern America ļ ↓ • He has to recognize that he • He saves Thao and Sue has more in common with his • serves as a male role model for Thao hides his feelings • solves his problems on his own is ready to use force • owns a muscle car (the Gran Torino) Walt sacrifices himself in order to atone for his war crimes. Thus he wants to restore law and order in the neighborhood

Englisch /

Gran Torino

Gran Torino

H

Helena

48 Followers
 

Englisch

 

11/12/13

Lernzettel

Gran Torino

Dieser Inhalt ist nur in der Knowunity App verfügbar.

 Inhalt
The film ,,Gran Torino" is an American drama film and was directed and produced by Clint Eastwood. The film is about an old man who'

App öffnen

Teilen

Speichern

265

Kommentare (3)

X

So ein schöner Lernzettel 😍😍 super nützlich und hilfreich!

• Abitur-Zusammenfassung

Ähnliche Knows

11

Gran Torino Abi Zusammenfassung

Know Gran Torino Abi Zusammenfassung thumbnail

166

 

11/12/13

Gran Torino

Know Gran Torino thumbnail

450

 

12

20

Abitur Zusammenfassung 2022 - GT, CLCL

Know Abitur Zusammenfassung 2022 - GT, CLCL thumbnail

36

 

11/12/13

2

Characterisation Walt Kowalski Gran Torino / Charakterisierung Walt Kowalski

Know Characterisation Walt Kowalski Gran Torino / Charakterisierung Walt Kowalski thumbnail

43

 

11/12/13

Mehr

Inhalt The film ,,Gran Torino" is an American drama film and was directed and produced by Clint Eastwood. The film is about an old man who's called Walt Kowalski and a boy who lives next to him, who's called Thao. Kowalski is a recently widowed Korean War veteran, alienated from his family and world. Walt's young neighbour Thao Vang Lor is pressured by his cousin into trying to steal Walt's car, for his initiation into his cousin's gang. However, Walt catches him and builds up a relationship with Thao and his family. Gran Torino Narrative structure A Hollywood drama Despite its complex sign system, the movie Gran Torino can be interpreted as a text with a narrative structure ● • With its clear sequence of the introduction of the situation, its disruption and resolution, Gran Torino strongly fits in with the drama genre The linear story is told through Walt Kowalski's eyes • The plot focuses on Walt's development and his friendship to Thao and his family. One major subplot, however, is the veteran's relation to Father Janovich ● Suspense culminates in chapter 28. The viewers' expectations of a showdown as a resolution of the conflict are contradicted, as the movie ends in the anticlimax.of Walt's death Two funerals frame the plot Setting • Highland Park - a troubled spot in Motor...

Nichts passendes dabei? Erkunde andere Fachbereiche.

Mit uns zu mehr Spaß am Lernen

Hilfe bei den Hausaufgaben

Mit dem Fragen-Feature hast du die Möglichkeit, jederzeit Fragen zu stellen und Antworten von anderen Schüler:innen zu erhalten.

Gemeinsam lernen

Mit Knowunity erhältest du Lerninhalte von anderen Schüler:innen auf eine moderne und gewohnte Art und Weise, um bestmöglich zu lernen. Schüler:innen teilen ihr Wissen, tauschen sich aus und helfen sich gegenseitig.

Sicher und geprüft

Ob Zusammenfassungen, Übungen oder Lernzettel - Knowunity kuratiert alle Inhalte und schafft eine sichere Lernumgebung zu der Ihr Kind jederzeit Zugang hat.

App herunterladen

Knowunity

Schule. Endlich Einfach.

App öffnen

Alternativer Bildtext:

City Detroit • Gran Torino is set in Highland Park, Michigan, which belongs to the Metro politan area of Detroit Throughout its history, the city has been connected with the local factories of Ford, Chrysler and General Motors • Metropolitan Detroit was particularly hit by the 2008 financial crisis, in the middle of which the movie was released ● • Once a booming city, Highland Park is now part of "that industrial graveyard called Detroit" (Dargis 2008). Characters Walt Kowalski • A racist who turns out to have a good heart • With respect to his values, Walt is "still living in the '50s." conservatism, patriotism and racial prejudices make American of that generation • He worked at Ford for his entire life • His him a typical white He is haunted by his Korean War experiences, in particular by his killing innocent people • In Walt's racist worldview, he does not distinguish between different Asian ethnic groups. For him, they are all alike. Thus his Hmong neighbors remind him of his bad conscience • With his 78 years, he is, so to speak, an outdated old timer like his vintage car, the Gran Torino, alienated from the changing world around him • He is also alienated from his two sons and their families and portrayed as a grumpy loner • His behavior is stereotypically masculine, e.g. solving problems on his own, protecting or defending himself and others with a gun and not going to the doctor • He becomes a male role model for Thao • Walt's getting into touch with his Hmong neighbors changes him. He has to learn that he has got more in common with his Hmong neighbors than with his own family. Walt realizes that he is responsible for the escalation of violence Sacrificing himself in the confrontation with the Hmong gangbangers, he finally finds peace as he takes the chance to atone for his lifelong guilt Thao and the Hmong Community The girls go to college, and the boys go to jail •The Hmong are a forgotten people, scattered over Laos, Thailand and Vietnam. They fought for the Americans in the Vietnam War after which they had to go into U.S. exile. ● • Most Hmong girls are able to adapt to American society, while the boys do not accept their fathers' values. Having no orientation, some of them get criminal Thao Vang Lor, a 16-year-old teenager, grows up in a female-dominated house without any male role model • He lacks self-confidence. Torn between gender roles, Hmong traditions and American standards of living, he does not know where he belongs to and searches for an identity • Easy to push around, he is pressurized into joining the Hmong gang. After his initiation ritual of stealing the Gran Torino failed, he wants to keep a distance, so the gangbangers try to take him by force • As compensation for his attempted theft Thao has to do odd jobs for Walt Kowalski. For the first time in his life he really rises to the tasks presented to him. • Being taught to talk and behave like a man, he grows from a teenager into a male adult. • He first accepts the gangbangers' brutality and does not want Walt to do anything against it. Only after Sue's rape he is willing to kill them. However, he is locked up in the basement of Walt's house, because Walt wants to prevent him from getting blood on his hands ● To his own surprise, he inherits Walt's Gran Torino, giving him the opportunity to assimilate into American society Sue is a strong young woman, able to live in both worlds of Hmong tradition and modern western liberalism. One sign for this is that she has a white boyfriend • Due to her self-confidence she does not shy away from any open confrontation with the Hmong gang or the African American men • Sue bridges the gap between her family and Walt Kowalski. Without her, they would not have become friends. Her grandmother Phong is a first-generation immigrant, full of prejudices against white America. She does not speak English • Spider (Sue's and Thao's cousin), Smokie and the other Hmong gangbangers terrorize the neighborhood. There is no resistance against them within the community. People do not dare to talk to the police • The peer group follows its own rules of enforcing their status by violence and retaliation. • Being witriessed when shooting the unarmed Walt, they are arrested ● Father Janovich • An inexperienced "over-educated, 27-year-old virgin" learns about life and death The Catholic Irishman delivers an impersonal eulogy for Dorothy Kowalski. He tries very hard to remove the veteran's wall of bitterness and shame, but for a long time he does not get through him • Walt's direct way of telling him his opinion and his hidden war experiences change Father Janovich's outlook on life It is quite a step for him to show some understanding for Thao's wish to kill the gangbangers After Walt's confession, Father Janovich calls the police to prevent the almost inevitable shootout •. In the sermon at Walt's funeral he publicly acknowledges Walt Kowalski's influence on him ● Themes Racism in a Multicultural Society "Hope for a Racist, and Maybe a Country" (Dargis) • Gran Torino questions the ideal of white America • The movie shows a racially segregated society. Despite its frequent racial slurs, Gran Torino has a strong anti-racist message • Nevertheless, the movie has also been criticized for confirming racial stereotypes Concepts of Masculinity Guns, cars, girls and a tough language ● • Walt Kowalski's characterization corresponds to the traditional definitions of masculinity • He went to war and possesses two guns He worked at Ford and has two cars: a pickup truck and the Gran Torino. He married and raised a family with two sons • Walt drinks a lot and is a chain-smoker • His language is vulgar and commanding • In contrast to Walt, Thao Vang Lor is bossed around by his sister and does women's work • Other Hmong teenagers are gangbangers, rebelling against their culture and their fathers' way of life With Walt's help, Thao is manned up: He is taught to talk like a man and starts dating You • He gets a job in construction, a field considered to be typically male When the Gran Torino is passed over to him, his assimilation to American society is completed Guilt and Redemption • Walt's twofold guilt. In the Korean War Walt killed about 13 people • He is particularly haunted by his murdering an innocent Korean teenager • More than 50 years later he is responsible for the escalation of violence in his neighborhood, including Sue's rape • He tries to atone for his twofold guilt by sacrificing himself • His redemption is expressed by the symbol of the cross when he is shot down (Gun) Violence •The right to bear arms • The Second Amendment to the Constitution grants every citizen the right to It is a hotly disputed issue in the United States • Walt Kowalski has at least two guns: his M1 Grand Rifle from the Korean War bear arms. and a pistol. He does not hesitate to take them in order to scare the gang bangers away • The Latino and Hmong gangs use their guns for enforcing dominance or com mitting crimes • Gran Torino is an example of the dynamics of violence and the acceleration of . reprisals Generation Gaps • Materialistic interests vs. social values • Walt and Mitch Kowalski do not only differ in their physical appearance, but also in their mentalities. Mitch is a typical representative of the post-war generation whose capitalist ideas are questioned and criticized. • The sons do not have time for their father •The relationship between Walt and his grandchildren seems to be even worse. In particular his granddaughter Ashley shows no respect for him • In contrast to Walt's grandchildren, Thao and Sue look up to him. They are similar to him in that they appreciate traditions and social ties • For Thao, Walt becomes a mentor or teacher and a bit of a father. • Young Father Janovich also learns a lot about life and death from the Korean War veteran The Ambiguity of Belonging • Cultural and social identity problems • Thao is torn between his Hmong traditions and his wish to assimilate into American society. All people around him emphasize Thao's female character traits and behavior. He searches for a clear male identity. • Having resisted the overall white flight, Walt lives alone amidst a Hmong dominated community in which he does not fit. • He recognizes that he has more in common with his Hmong neighbors than with his own family. • Walt is also "alienated from himself" (Ulmer 2017, p. 52) Symbols and Motifs Symbols and Motifs ● The Gran Torino and the motif of life and death dominate the movie • The Gran Torino fits to Walt Kowalski's personality as it expresses his masculinity • It is a necessary part in Thao's process of becoming a man • The vintage car bridges the gap between Walt and Thao. It is a symbol of the family connection between them. The mirror stands for Walt's moments of introspection • The lighter is a reminder of Walt's guilt • Life and death, the main motif of the movie, are juxtaposed. Death is present and foreshadowed throughout the movie by the two funerals, Walt's smoking, his coughing up blood and the final shootout • The movie plays with gender stereotypes Cinematic Devices Camera • Point of view, dominance and intense emotions • The camera supports the fact that the story is told through Walt's eyes • Eastwood uses the high- and low-angle camera positions to indicate dominance or hierarchy; eye-level shots symbolize the equality of characters Close-ups are used in moments of intense emotions Long shots or establishing shots introduce a new setting • In dramatic scenes the director chooses a hand-held camera • Walt's death is filmed in slow motion ● • Dissolves are used to underline the connection between two scenes or. to indicate a change of location or the passing of time Structure FDZER A L U N ,,Get off my lawn" initiation ritual of stealing the 1972 Ford Gran Torino rivaling gangs; Thao and the Hispanic gang Walt's family problems Music and Lighting Cultural and atmospheric indicators The melancholy title song "Gran Torino" picks up the main motifs of the movie such as the ambiguity of belonging, war scars, loneliness and disappointed dreams • Drum sounds are frequent signals for dramatic tension. They indicate that Walt Kowalski is in his "war-mode" • The Latino and the Hmong gangs listen to music which reflects their own cultural background Low-key lighting corresponds to the melancholy atmosphere of the movie • The bright daylight in the final scene supports the positive message of the movie. ● Sue 's harassment by the African Americans drive-by shooting; Sue 's rape Walt's death Walt's last will FUNERAL F Setting 1. Highland Park until the 1960s a prestigious, white, middle-class neighborhood • inhabited by car plant workers with the same cultural backround Walt Kowalski in 2008 a multicultural community in reality with over 90% African Americans 3. Charlevoix St., Detroit • in the movie a Hmong dominated, run-down neighborhood Locations within Metro Detroit • symbolizes African-American "territory" • bad reputation for its crime rate • Walt as the only white man left conservative values: hanging on to the past patriotism importance of family • respect towards the old ● racial prejudices against Asians ● ● ● White flight Locations within Metro Detroit Hmong neighbors than with his own family develops a kinship to wards Thao and Sue ● 2. Rich residential districts (cf. Mitch Kowalski's house) • Eastwood's intention: ghetto look and pictures of decay Walt is still haunted by his Korean War (1950-1953) memories: he killed at least 13 men, including one innocent teenager ↓ manly behavior: ● • background: financial crisis 2008 which hit Motor City Detroit very hard At the beginning of the movie Walt is shown as a grumpy old man alienated from his family. He does not belong to the changed neighborhood / modern America ļ ↓ • He has to recognize that he • He saves Thao and Sue has more in common with his • serves as a male role model for Thao hides his feelings • solves his problems on his own is ready to use force • owns a muscle car (the Gran Torino) Walt sacrifices himself in order to atone for his war crimes. Thus he wants to restore law and order in the neighborhood