Englisch /

to kill a mockingbird

to kill a mockingbird

user profile picture

Aylin

132 Followers
 

Englisch

 

11/12

Ausarbeitung

to kill a mockingbird

 Speech analysis:
In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, the main character's father, Atticus Finch, is
defending Tom Robinson,

Kommentare (1)

Teilen

Speichern

71

Speech analysis and summary of chapter 21-23

Nichts passendes dabei? Erkunde andere Fachbereiche.

Speech analysis: In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, the main character's father, Atticus Finch, is defending Tom Robinson, who was accused of apparently beating Mayella Ewell. Atticus is defending Tom Robinson, a noble black man, who is accused of beating and raping a young white woman named Mayella Ewell. Her family is poor, uneducated, and has a bad reputation. Although Atticus is only saying what he believes, the town is lashing out on him for it, but he ignores them. He is certain of Robinson's innocence and knows he deserves the chance to be defended, despite the likelihood of still being condemned by the jury. Atticus Finch is respected throughout the city of Maycomb, Alabama. He is known to be truthful and righteous, and he lives his life by doing what is right. The townspeople know Atticus is a good man, which adds to his credibility. His position as a lawyer in the city also greatly increases his reliability, especially as there are not many college educated people in Maycomb. Atticus showed more integrity during his speech in speaking of the way he addressed the crowd. He understands very well who his audience and knows the beliefs and prejudices of the inhabitants of his southern city. Atticus refers to them...

Mit uns zu mehr Spaß am Lernen

Hilfe bei den Hausaufgaben

Mit dem Fragen-Feature hast du die Möglichkeit, jederzeit Fragen zu stellen und Antworten von anderen Schüler:innen zu erhalten.

Gemeinsam lernen

Mit Knowunity erhältest du Lerninhalte von anderen Schüler:innen auf eine moderne und gewohnte Art und Weise, um bestmöglich zu lernen. Schüler:innen teilen ihr Wissen, tauschen sich aus und helfen sich gegenseitig.

Sicher und geprüft

Ob Zusammenfassungen, Übungen oder Lernzettel - Knowunity kuratiert alle Inhalte und schafft eine sichere Lernumgebung zu der Ihr Kind jederzeit Zugang hat.

App herunterladen

Alternativer Bildtext:

directly in his speech and questions these notions, such as the idea that "all Negroes are immoral beings." While even addressing these prejudices is taboo, Atticus does so respectfully, addressing not only individuals but the entire city. The speech logically attracted the audience. He first said that there was not enough evidence for the court to come to the trial, and pointed out: "New York State did not produce any evidence that Tom Robinson was charged with a crime." He went on to point out that there is evidence that Mayella Ewell was beaten by someone's left hand. And Tom Robinson is clearly right-handed. It is important to tell these true and logical facts at the beginning of the speech because it shows the loopholes in the jury's case and sowed the seeds of doubt from the beginning, because when the audience has doubts, it is easier to appeal to emotions. Atticus evokes the emotions of the audience by painting Mayella Ewell as a weak, beaten woman whose only drawback was kissing a darker-skinned man. He evokes sympathy for Mayella at first, but then changes it by saying that Mayella's act of risking Tom Robinson's life to conceal her own guilt is unforgivable. Then Atticus tries to transfer the audience's pity to Tom Robinson, who is the real victim in the courtroom. He summons so-called "witnesses" who thought the jury would believe them only because of the color of Robinson's skin. In this way, he refers to the emotions of the jury, saying that they are smarter than just judging skin color. It addresses the racist prejudices the jury may have had and tells them that they are better, making them feel guilty about the racism they may have felt. Atticus tells the jury that he is sure they will make the right decision, saying, "Now I am convinced that you gentlemen, without passion, will see through the evidence you have heard, make up your mind, and bring this man back to his family." It puts additional pressure on them to make their choice based on facts rather than a predetermined concept of race. He concludes his speech with a final emotional appeal, stirring up religion. Atticus says, “In the name of God, do your duty, Believe Tom Robinson." He tells the jury that they are working for God by making the right decision by referring to their religion, which is often a very effective appeal. Unfortunately, despite Atticus' excellent credibility and logical and emotional appeals, the Maycomb jury cannot reject their horrific racist views and find Tom Robinson guilty. Summary: Chapter 21 Calpurnia passes a note informing Atticus that his children are missing, but the newspaper publisher Braxton Underwood tells him that the children were in " On the colorful balcony. They meet downstairs and. us orderes them to go home. Alexandra is shocked to learn where they had gone. They came back after eating, and the jury made its verdict at around 11pm. The guilty verdict is pronounced. After talking with Mr. Gilmer, he packed up his briefcase and leaves, and everyone on the colored balcony, including Pastor Sykes, stood and applauded. Summary: Chapter 22 Atticus, Jem, Scout, and Dill return home feeling defeated. Jem is more devastated by the verdict and asks his father how the verdict was delivered, which he admits he doesn't understand. In the morning, Calpurnia finds plenty of food on the back stairs - a gift from Tom Robinson's supporters as gratitude for Atticus' support. Miss Stephanie instructs the children outside about the details of the case, but Miss Maudie calls her off and invites the children for cookies. It helps them understand how events in this case have moved the community forward, if only a little. When they leave the Maudie's house unconvinced, Miss Rachel informs them that Mr. Ewell met Atticus at the post office, spitting at him and threatening him. Summary: Chapter 23 Jem, Scout, Dill, and Alexandra are worried about Atticus after the ordeal with Mr. Ewell, but he assures them that everything is fine. Everyone is eagerly awaiting the appeal of Tom Robinson, who Atticus is confident has a good chance of winning. When Atticus claims that he allowed a relative of Walter Cunningham to serve on the jury, Scout remembers Walter and promises to invite him to lunch again once the school reopens. But Alexandra forbids her way of playing her with Walter because he is "trash" and can impart bad habits to her. Scout is upset by what her aunt says about Walter when Jem says that he is beginning to understand why Boo prefers to stay home.

Englisch /

to kill a mockingbird

to kill a mockingbird

user profile picture

Aylin

132 Followers
 

Englisch

 

11/12

Ausarbeitung

to kill a mockingbird

Dieser Inhalt ist nur in der Knowunity App verfügbar.

 Speech analysis:
In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, the main character's father, Atticus Finch, is
defending Tom Robinson,

App öffnen

Teilen

Speichern

71

Kommentare (1)

C

So ein schöner Lernzettel 😍😍 super nützlich und hilfreich!

Speech analysis and summary of chapter 21-23

Ähnliche Knows

To Kill a Mockingbird

Know To Kill a Mockingbird  thumbnail

882

 

11/12/13

To Kill a Mockingbird

Know To Kill a Mockingbird thumbnail

343

 

11/12/13

4

Summary of „To Kill a Mockingbird“ (all chapters)

Know Summary of „To Kill a Mockingbird“ (all chapters) thumbnail

27

 

11/12/13

2

Atticus Finch — To Kill A Mockingbird — Characterisation

Know Atticus Finch — To Kill A Mockingbird — Characterisation thumbnail

111

 

11/12/13

Mehr

Speech analysis: In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, the main character's father, Atticus Finch, is defending Tom Robinson, who was accused of apparently beating Mayella Ewell. Atticus is defending Tom Robinson, a noble black man, who is accused of beating and raping a young white woman named Mayella Ewell. Her family is poor, uneducated, and has a bad reputation. Although Atticus is only saying what he believes, the town is lashing out on him for it, but he ignores them. He is certain of Robinson's innocence and knows he deserves the chance to be defended, despite the likelihood of still being condemned by the jury. Atticus Finch is respected throughout the city of Maycomb, Alabama. He is known to be truthful and righteous, and he lives his life by doing what is right. The townspeople know Atticus is a good man, which adds to his credibility. His position as a lawyer in the city also greatly increases his reliability, especially as there are not many college educated people in Maycomb. Atticus showed more integrity during his speech in speaking of the way he addressed the crowd. He understands very well who his audience and knows the beliefs and prejudices of the inhabitants of his southern city. Atticus refers to them...

Nichts passendes dabei? Erkunde andere Fachbereiche.

Mit uns zu mehr Spaß am Lernen

Hilfe bei den Hausaufgaben

Mit dem Fragen-Feature hast du die Möglichkeit, jederzeit Fragen zu stellen und Antworten von anderen Schüler:innen zu erhalten.

Gemeinsam lernen

Mit Knowunity erhältest du Lerninhalte von anderen Schüler:innen auf eine moderne und gewohnte Art und Weise, um bestmöglich zu lernen. Schüler:innen teilen ihr Wissen, tauschen sich aus und helfen sich gegenseitig.

Sicher und geprüft

Ob Zusammenfassungen, Übungen oder Lernzettel - Knowunity kuratiert alle Inhalte und schafft eine sichere Lernumgebung zu der Ihr Kind jederzeit Zugang hat.

App herunterladen

Knowunity

Schule. Endlich Einfach.

App öffnen

Alternativer Bildtext:

directly in his speech and questions these notions, such as the idea that "all Negroes are immoral beings." While even addressing these prejudices is taboo, Atticus does so respectfully, addressing not only individuals but the entire city. The speech logically attracted the audience. He first said that there was not enough evidence for the court to come to the trial, and pointed out: "New York State did not produce any evidence that Tom Robinson was charged with a crime." He went on to point out that there is evidence that Mayella Ewell was beaten by someone's left hand. And Tom Robinson is clearly right-handed. It is important to tell these true and logical facts at the beginning of the speech because it shows the loopholes in the jury's case and sowed the seeds of doubt from the beginning, because when the audience has doubts, it is easier to appeal to emotions. Atticus evokes the emotions of the audience by painting Mayella Ewell as a weak, beaten woman whose only drawback was kissing a darker-skinned man. He evokes sympathy for Mayella at first, but then changes it by saying that Mayella's act of risking Tom Robinson's life to conceal her own guilt is unforgivable. Then Atticus tries to transfer the audience's pity to Tom Robinson, who is the real victim in the courtroom. He summons so-called "witnesses" who thought the jury would believe them only because of the color of Robinson's skin. In this way, he refers to the emotions of the jury, saying that they are smarter than just judging skin color. It addresses the racist prejudices the jury may have had and tells them that they are better, making them feel guilty about the racism they may have felt. Atticus tells the jury that he is sure they will make the right decision, saying, "Now I am convinced that you gentlemen, without passion, will see through the evidence you have heard, make up your mind, and bring this man back to his family." It puts additional pressure on them to make their choice based on facts rather than a predetermined concept of race. He concludes his speech with a final emotional appeal, stirring up religion. Atticus says, “In the name of God, do your duty, Believe Tom Robinson." He tells the jury that they are working for God by making the right decision by referring to their religion, which is often a very effective appeal. Unfortunately, despite Atticus' excellent credibility and logical and emotional appeals, the Maycomb jury cannot reject their horrific racist views and find Tom Robinson guilty. Summary: Chapter 21 Calpurnia passes a note informing Atticus that his children are missing, but the newspaper publisher Braxton Underwood tells him that the children were in " On the colorful balcony. They meet downstairs and. us orderes them to go home. Alexandra is shocked to learn where they had gone. They came back after eating, and the jury made its verdict at around 11pm. The guilty verdict is pronounced. After talking with Mr. Gilmer, he packed up his briefcase and leaves, and everyone on the colored balcony, including Pastor Sykes, stood and applauded. Summary: Chapter 22 Atticus, Jem, Scout, and Dill return home feeling defeated. Jem is more devastated by the verdict and asks his father how the verdict was delivered, which he admits he doesn't understand. In the morning, Calpurnia finds plenty of food on the back stairs - a gift from Tom Robinson's supporters as gratitude for Atticus' support. Miss Stephanie instructs the children outside about the details of the case, but Miss Maudie calls her off and invites the children for cookies. It helps them understand how events in this case have moved the community forward, if only a little. When they leave the Maudie's house unconvinced, Miss Rachel informs them that Mr. Ewell met Atticus at the post office, spitting at him and threatening him. Summary: Chapter 23 Jem, Scout, Dill, and Alexandra are worried about Atticus after the ordeal with Mr. Ewell, but he assures them that everything is fine. Everyone is eagerly awaiting the appeal of Tom Robinson, who Atticus is confident has a good chance of winning. When Atticus claims that he allowed a relative of Walter Cunningham to serve on the jury, Scout remembers Walter and promises to invite him to lunch again once the school reopens. But Alexandra forbids her way of playing her with Walter because he is "trash" and can impart bad habits to her. Scout is upset by what her aunt says about Walter when Jem says that he is beginning to understand why Boo prefers to stay home.