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Analysing a speech: President Bush’s radio addres

Analysing a speech: President Bush’s radio addres

 mock exam
President Bush's radio address
July 4, 2006
Task 1:
The radio address that was delivered by the former president Bush on July 4th

Analysing a speech: President Bush’s radio addres

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Probeklausur: President Bush’s radio addres on July 4, 2006

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mock exam President Bush's radio address July 4, 2006 Task 1: The radio address that was delivered by the former president Bush on July 4th 2006 is about celebrating Independence Day and honoring America for its liberty. At the beginning of the speech, President Bush and his wife Laura greet the Americans and wish them a happy 4th of July weekend. The president looks forward to spending Independence Day in North Carolina. He then mentions how John Adams predicted to his wife in 1776 that Americans will celebrate Independence Day as the great anniversary festival and every year, Americans do just that. They celebrate Independence Day all across the nation with their family and friends with fireworks and barbecues. Besides, Americans give thanks to the freedom and honor all who sacrifice for it. President Bush also mentions victory of the founders who sacrifice for their country and believe that freedom is a gift from God. Furthermore, Americans believe that the Declaration applies for everyone and that all people have unalienable rights and American support. The president says all citizens should be grateful for their nation, their future and their freedom. At the end of the radio address, Bush thanks everyone for listening. Task 2: In the following, the president Bush's radio address from July 4th, 2006 will be...

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analysed. His speech is structured in seven paragraphs and each contains two to three sentences, which are mostly very detailed. The speaker's sentences contain a lot of commas, which makes them long and complex. The President's statements are concise and his speech contains descriptive elements, which are mostly related to the events that happened in the past, such as Independence Day or sacrifices (e.g. II. 12-16). In his speech, the president uses spoken English with several elements of the elevated style and he always expresses his thoughts precisely. The atmosphere created in the speech is rather optimistic, which is also the speaker's aim, due to the holiday they are celebrating. With his optimistic choice of words, the speaker wants to underline how important the independence day is for Americans and wants other people to think the same. Additionally to the structure, the author uses several stylistic devices that intensify the content of the speaker's aim to make all people, especially Americans, honor the anniversary of the Independence Day. With an opening sentence "Good morning" (I. 1), Bush greets the listeners and addresses them directly. He also uses that sentence to establish contact with them. In his speech, the president often uses personal pronouns, such as "our" (e.g. I. 3, 19) or "we" (e.g. l. 11, 17, 25 ...). Those personal pronouns make the listeners feel personally involved, which is also the speaker's aim. The president talks highly about Independence Day and mentions several times how important freedom is in America (cf. I. 5/ I. 31-32 ... ). This way, he wants motivate all American citizens, respectively all the people in the world to think the same and speak highly of America as well. In the second paragraph of the speech, Bush talks about American history using facts. More precisely, he mentions John Adams and his visions about Independence Day (cf. II. 7-9). To reinforce those facts, he quotes John Adams (cf. II. 9-11). The quotation could also be seen as an enumeration, due to many commas and similar words that follow one another. This gives the listeners a clear picture of what you can imagine under "celebrating the Independence Day". In II. 28-29, Bush uses an enumeration of some bad events that happened in the past to show the people what kind of things Americans had to do for their freedom. It also shows strength for the survival of their country, despite all the horrible things they have been through. "... we should be proud of our heritage, grateful for our liberty, and fondinet in our future." (II. 36-37) is also an enumeration that underlines how grateful Americans should be for their country and the freedom they have. Besides, there is an anaphora in II. 39-41. Bush repeats "we still” three times, which firstly makes the listener feel personally involved in the situation he is talking about, due to a personal pronoun "we" and secondly gives the listener the impression that no one gave up the hope yet and that the American dream, even though not fulfilled yet, is worth fighting for and worth waiting for. In line 38-39, Bush says: "And our Nation remains proud to carry freedom's torch". Bush associates this line with the Statue of Liberty, which holds a golden torch that symbolizes liberty. Besides, this line fits the topic of the speech, as Independence Day is about freedom and liberty. To sum up the analysis, it can be said that Bush states his mind very clearly and he knows exactly what he is talking about. He refers to the listener a lot, which makes his speech also very convincing. Task 3: Dear diary, today, the US is celebrating the 4th Of July, known as Independence Day. All of my relatives came to our house today for dinner and the main topic on the table was "President Bush's radio address". All of them were so enthusiastic about his speech and I guess Bush really thrilled them. I listened to that radio address as well, but I wasn't really that impressed. I have a feeling that every year, every president is talking about the same thing over and over, which is a fact, but also it seems to me that every year, they just replace their words with some synonyms and actually repeat those same words again and again. I really don't understand what all of that is for and I have often asked myself "Why are we even celebrating Independence Day?". Every year, the president is talking about free country and about the American dream, but what exactly IS the American dream? On the 4th of July 1776 the Declaration of Independence was published. Everyone thought that it was gonna change everything and mostly people's rights and freedom. But did it really change that? I guess its actually a dumb rethorical question to ask. Of course it didn't change anything. It seems to me that the Declaration of Independence was published only for the white men, because after it was written, women and black people still didn't have the same rights as white men (or didn't have any rights at all). I guess that still, in some situations women and black people are so underrated and that white men have all the rights they could. For me, the only people that can call themselves "Americans" are the natives, because this is THEIR land. They've been here before us. In my opinion, Europeans have or at least had no right to "steal" America from the natives, because natives would have never stolen "our" land from us. I'm not a native, so I basically don't see myself as an American either. My ancestors came from Europe and that is how I also see myself. As a European. We live in the 21st century and things, such as racism, sexicm, etc. are still things people have to fight against. Yeah, fireworks are cool but I still refuse to celebrate the 4th of July like everyone else does. My family worships that holiday, out of whichever reasons. They have actually never really asked me about my opinion, but I guess they've figured it out themselves that I'm not participating in the celebration that much and I like it that they don't directly make a big deal out of it. Anyways, like I already mentioned, fireworks are cool and I actually can't wait to see them in an hour or so, but honestly I wish I could be the one that delivers the speech on the radio and I bet there are many, many, many people who would agree with me and my arguments, as well. Yours,

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Analysing a speech: President Bush’s radio addres

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jamies  

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 mock exam
President Bush's radio address
July 4, 2006
Task 1:
The radio address that was delivered by the former president Bush on July 4th

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Probeklausur: President Bush’s radio addres on July 4, 2006

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mock exam President Bush's radio address July 4, 2006 Task 1: The radio address that was delivered by the former president Bush on July 4th 2006 is about celebrating Independence Day and honoring America for its liberty. At the beginning of the speech, President Bush and his wife Laura greet the Americans and wish them a happy 4th of July weekend. The president looks forward to spending Independence Day in North Carolina. He then mentions how John Adams predicted to his wife in 1776 that Americans will celebrate Independence Day as the great anniversary festival and every year, Americans do just that. They celebrate Independence Day all across the nation with their family and friends with fireworks and barbecues. Besides, Americans give thanks to the freedom and honor all who sacrifice for it. President Bush also mentions victory of the founders who sacrifice for their country and believe that freedom is a gift from God. Furthermore, Americans believe that the Declaration applies for everyone and that all people have unalienable rights and American support. The president says all citizens should be grateful for their nation, their future and their freedom. At the end of the radio address, Bush thanks everyone for listening. Task 2: In the following, the president Bush's radio address from July 4th, 2006 will be...

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analysed. His speech is structured in seven paragraphs and each contains two to three sentences, which are mostly very detailed. The speaker's sentences contain a lot of commas, which makes them long and complex. The President's statements are concise and his speech contains descriptive elements, which are mostly related to the events that happened in the past, such as Independence Day or sacrifices (e.g. II. 12-16). In his speech, the president uses spoken English with several elements of the elevated style and he always expresses his thoughts precisely. The atmosphere created in the speech is rather optimistic, which is also the speaker's aim, due to the holiday they are celebrating. With his optimistic choice of words, the speaker wants to underline how important the independence day is for Americans and wants other people to think the same. Additionally to the structure, the author uses several stylistic devices that intensify the content of the speaker's aim to make all people, especially Americans, honor the anniversary of the Independence Day. With an opening sentence "Good morning" (I. 1), Bush greets the listeners and addresses them directly. He also uses that sentence to establish contact with them. In his speech, the president often uses personal pronouns, such as "our" (e.g. I. 3, 19) or "we" (e.g. l. 11, 17, 25 ...). Those personal pronouns make the listeners feel personally involved, which is also the speaker's aim. The president talks highly about Independence Day and mentions several times how important freedom is in America (cf. I. 5/ I. 31-32 ... ). This way, he wants motivate all American citizens, respectively all the people in the world to think the same and speak highly of America as well. In the second paragraph of the speech, Bush talks about American history using facts. More precisely, he mentions John Adams and his visions about Independence Day (cf. II. 7-9). To reinforce those facts, he quotes John Adams (cf. II. 9-11). The quotation could also be seen as an enumeration, due to many commas and similar words that follow one another. This gives the listeners a clear picture of what you can imagine under "celebrating the Independence Day". In II. 28-29, Bush uses an enumeration of some bad events that happened in the past to show the people what kind of things Americans had to do for their freedom. It also shows strength for the survival of their country, despite all the horrible things they have been through. "... we should be proud of our heritage, grateful for our liberty, and fondinet in our future." (II. 36-37) is also an enumeration that underlines how grateful Americans should be for their country and the freedom they have. Besides, there is an anaphora in II. 39-41. Bush repeats "we still” three times, which firstly makes the listener feel personally involved in the situation he is talking about, due to a personal pronoun "we" and secondly gives the listener the impression that no one gave up the hope yet and that the American dream, even though not fulfilled yet, is worth fighting for and worth waiting for. In line 38-39, Bush says: "And our Nation remains proud to carry freedom's torch". Bush associates this line with the Statue of Liberty, which holds a golden torch that symbolizes liberty. Besides, this line fits the topic of the speech, as Independence Day is about freedom and liberty. To sum up the analysis, it can be said that Bush states his mind very clearly and he knows exactly what he is talking about. He refers to the listener a lot, which makes his speech also very convincing. Task 3: Dear diary, today, the US is celebrating the 4th Of July, known as Independence Day. All of my relatives came to our house today for dinner and the main topic on the table was "President Bush's radio address". All of them were so enthusiastic about his speech and I guess Bush really thrilled them. I listened to that radio address as well, but I wasn't really that impressed. I have a feeling that every year, every president is talking about the same thing over and over, which is a fact, but also it seems to me that every year, they just replace their words with some synonyms and actually repeat those same words again and again. I really don't understand what all of that is for and I have often asked myself "Why are we even celebrating Independence Day?". Every year, the president is talking about free country and about the American dream, but what exactly IS the American dream? On the 4th of July 1776 the Declaration of Independence was published. Everyone thought that it was gonna change everything and mostly people's rights and freedom. But did it really change that? I guess its actually a dumb rethorical question to ask. Of course it didn't change anything. It seems to me that the Declaration of Independence was published only for the white men, because after it was written, women and black people still didn't have the same rights as white men (or didn't have any rights at all). I guess that still, in some situations women and black people are so underrated and that white men have all the rights they could. For me, the only people that can call themselves "Americans" are the natives, because this is THEIR land. They've been here before us. In my opinion, Europeans have or at least had no right to "steal" America from the natives, because natives would have never stolen "our" land from us. I'm not a native, so I basically don't see myself as an American either. My ancestors came from Europe and that is how I also see myself. As a European. We live in the 21st century and things, such as racism, sexicm, etc. are still things people have to fight against. Yeah, fireworks are cool but I still refuse to celebrate the 4th of July like everyone else does. My family worships that holiday, out of whichever reasons. They have actually never really asked me about my opinion, but I guess they've figured it out themselves that I'm not participating in the celebration that much and I like it that they don't directly make a big deal out of it. Anyways, like I already mentioned, fireworks are cool and I actually can't wait to see them in an hour or so, but honestly I wish I could be the one that delivers the speech on the radio and I bet there are many, many, many people who would agree with me and my arguments, as well. Yours,