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Sonnet 130

Sonnet 130

 Parallelism
Sonnet 130
Sonnet 130
Comparison
a My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
b Coral is far more red than her lips' red; Rhet

Sonnet 130

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Parallelism Sonnet 130 Sonnet 130 Comparison a My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; b Coral is far more red than her lips' red; Rhetorical question a If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; b If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. Metaphor cs I have seen roses damasked, red and white, d But no such roses see I in her cheeks; Metaphor c And in some perfumes is there more delight Metaphor d Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. e I love to hear her speak, yet well I know fo That music hath a far more pleasing sound; e I grant I never saw a goddess go; Alliteration f My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. 9 And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. Simile My beloved one's eyes do not look as beautiful as the sun, Her lips are not as red as coral, Her breasts are grey in comparison to the snow Her hair is like black wires growing on her head I have seen beautiful red and white roses But not on her cheeks And some perfumes smell better then her breath I like her voice even though some music still sound better My beloved one is not divine, As she treads on...

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the ground And still, i think my honest love is rare, As others belie her with false comparisons In the ,,Sonnet 130" written by William Shakespeare and published in 1609 the lyrical I describes his beloved one and compares her outward appearance, smell and sound to different things with a negative context. At the end he realizes though that the outward appearance is not important and he truly loves her for her inner beauty. L.1-4 (First quatrain) He compares his beloved person to different objects as well as nature while pointing out the flaws of his beloved. L.5-8 (second quatrain) He talks about her smell and again criticizes his beloved person with saying that there are more delight perfumes than hers. L.9-12 (third quatrain) He talks about the sound of his beloved one's voice and again points out that there are more pleasing sounds than her voice, but he still likes to hear her speak. Therefore she definitely is not a goddess to him. L.13-14 (couplet) At the end you can find a love declaration in which he says that her beauty is not comparable and their love is honest and rare. Structure -Sonnet 14 lines —>3 quatrains + 1 couplet -lambic pentameter (10 syllable line —> 5 stressed and 5 unstressed) -Turning point —> 1.9 ( first part = only negative aspects, second part = realization that she's still important to him and he loves certain aspects about her) Comparison Parallelism Rhetorical question Metaphor Analysis Metaphor Alliteration L.1: ,,My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun" L. 3-4: ,,If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head." L.6-7: ,,But no such roses i see in her cheeks; Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks." Language L.11-12: ,,I grant i never saw a goddess go My mistress if she walks treads on the ground." He compares his beloved one's eyes to the sun which depicts her eyes as dull and something not beautiful -> The reader gets the impression of him not being satisfied with her outward appearance The parallelism has the effect that the reader thinks that the enumeration of the flaws of the beloved one are endless which creates a negative picture of her in the readers mind. By using the rhetorical question he directly addresses the reader to make him think about her looks and in combination with the other comparisons the reader imagines someone unattractive. The metaphor emphasizes the fact that the lyrical I finds her unattractive, as he compares her hair with wires. By the use of this metaphor the lyrical I criticizes and almost embarrasses his beloved one. It means that he is not able to find such roses in her; she is so pale, she has not got red cheeks (blush) and her breath smells unpleasantly. It shows that the lyrical I clearly sees his beloved one not as a goddess as he saw her tread on the ground, unlike a goddess. This underlines the fact that he does not think his beloved one is perfect.

Englisch /

Sonnet 130

Sonnet 130

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Uliana

42 Followers
 

12

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 Parallelism
Sonnet 130
Sonnet 130
Comparison
a My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
b Coral is far more red than her lips' red; Rhet

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Summary, Analysis of structure and language

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Parallelism Sonnet 130 Sonnet 130 Comparison a My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; b Coral is far more red than her lips' red; Rhetorical question a If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; b If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. Metaphor cs I have seen roses damasked, red and white, d But no such roses see I in her cheeks; Metaphor c And in some perfumes is there more delight Metaphor d Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. e I love to hear her speak, yet well I know fo That music hath a far more pleasing sound; e I grant I never saw a goddess go; Alliteration f My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. 9 And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. Simile My beloved one's eyes do not look as beautiful as the sun, Her lips are not as red as coral, Her breasts are grey in comparison to the snow Her hair is like black wires growing on her head I have seen beautiful red and white roses But not on her cheeks And some perfumes smell better then her breath I like her voice even though some music still sound better My beloved one is not divine, As she treads on...

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the ground And still, i think my honest love is rare, As others belie her with false comparisons In the ,,Sonnet 130" written by William Shakespeare and published in 1609 the lyrical I describes his beloved one and compares her outward appearance, smell and sound to different things with a negative context. At the end he realizes though that the outward appearance is not important and he truly loves her for her inner beauty. L.1-4 (First quatrain) He compares his beloved person to different objects as well as nature while pointing out the flaws of his beloved. L.5-8 (second quatrain) He talks about her smell and again criticizes his beloved person with saying that there are more delight perfumes than hers. L.9-12 (third quatrain) He talks about the sound of his beloved one's voice and again points out that there are more pleasing sounds than her voice, but he still likes to hear her speak. Therefore she definitely is not a goddess to him. L.13-14 (couplet) At the end you can find a love declaration in which he says that her beauty is not comparable and their love is honest and rare. Structure -Sonnet 14 lines —>3 quatrains + 1 couplet -lambic pentameter (10 syllable line —> 5 stressed and 5 unstressed) -Turning point —> 1.9 ( first part = only negative aspects, second part = realization that she's still important to him and he loves certain aspects about her) Comparison Parallelism Rhetorical question Metaphor Analysis Metaphor Alliteration L.1: ,,My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun" L. 3-4: ,,If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head." L.6-7: ,,But no such roses i see in her cheeks; Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks." Language L.11-12: ,,I grant i never saw a goddess go My mistress if she walks treads on the ground." He compares his beloved one's eyes to the sun which depicts her eyes as dull and something not beautiful -> The reader gets the impression of him not being satisfied with her outward appearance The parallelism has the effect that the reader thinks that the enumeration of the flaws of the beloved one are endless which creates a negative picture of her in the readers mind. By using the rhetorical question he directly addresses the reader to make him think about her looks and in combination with the other comparisons the reader imagines someone unattractive. The metaphor emphasizes the fact that the lyrical I finds her unattractive, as he compares her hair with wires. By the use of this metaphor the lyrical I criticizes and almost embarrasses his beloved one. It means that he is not able to find such roses in her; she is so pale, she has not got red cheeks (blush) and her breath smells unpleasantly. It shows that the lyrical I clearly sees his beloved one not as a goddess as he saw her tread on the ground, unlike a goddess. This underlines the fact that he does not think his beloved one is perfect.