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the escape

the escape

 Mariam
-
on the other hand, she must have taught her kid what's the right thing to do in such situation because she
tried to do something a

the escape

S

Swani

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12/13

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Mariam - on the other hand, she must have taught her kid what's the right thing to do in such situation because she tried to do something about it, but her mother didn't let her Somali woman example for foreigners who are very powerful courage to really stand up for others is lacking by everyone on the bus because of fear of being 'hated' by be majority of society Narrator political activist (had to flee because of her activism) hypocritical good manners fierce, powerful sheltered by mother clever selfless - selfish lack of interference and confidence kind (pointing out free seats) good-hearted Somali Woman - helpful, good will inferior less powerful when it comes to really acting -mind # actions strong and fierce stubborn not inferior dominant - standing up for herself calm unbothered => firm The escape - Qaisra Shahraz (2009) Summary Samir, the protagonist is 73 years old and from Pakistan living in the UK starts of in the mosque in Longsight where he is praying for his dead wife son dropped him off at the mosque and is supposed to pick him up bumps into old friend Manzoor who invites him to his home but Samir refuses Because he was afraid of old memories and witnessing the intimacy between husband and wife his son is a sports manager he has a house with 5 bedrooms but with his family gone and wife's passing all the joy...

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has gone away seems very lonely and doesn't know what to do within an hour, because later that day his son is picking him up again very special religious day where there's usually a lot of food but there's nothing on his kitchen table, a year ago everyone has been there (kids + daughters and sons-in-law) he eats cornflakes instead of the traditional food his son arrives (let his father eat alone at home => could have accompanied him) family gathered at eldest daughters house grandson makes him smile even though he missen his wife a lot and doesn't know how to cope with the situation => tearing up and no searching for contact with family Samir announces that he wants to go back to Pakistan for a few months to visit his family notices that he called Pakistan home and when he thinks about it he is unsure whether that is the truth three days later he left for Pakistan and is greeted by his family there at the airport visits his parents graves and sobs, notices how strange it would be to be buried on a whole different continent than his parents wife did some charitable work in Pakistan in a village which he visits story reveals that the English capital is not for him as he is very shy and uncomfortable every time he goes out but at the same time he feels uncomfortable in Pakistan as well and the situation is very awkward "Flashback" began a knitwear business when he first came to Manchester he worked his way up to a point where he didn't have to worry about money anymore - "Present" visits the family who his wife financially supported woman cries over death and eventually Samir bursts out into tears as well the family reminds him of how lonely he is back in the UK, living in his big house all alone he offers to keep on supporting them financially in the future leaves their home without being recognised or recognising anyone leaves Pakistan after only a week (i guess.) on the plane he sits next to a man of his age called Ibrahim, they have very similar life's and talk about why they visited their “homeland', turns out they are unsure which one is the homeland in the end Samir says he wants to escape to the UK and to a new home which is an elderly peoples home leaves his five bedroom home to his children and his saving for the family in Pakistan calls the elderly peoples home his home in the very end Short summary The short story The Escape by Qaisra Shahraz, published in 2009, is about Samir, a seventy-three-year old Pakistani man who, after the death of his wife, reassesses his life, searching for a home and a sense of belonging The story starts with Samir praying at the mosque in his old neighbourhood He gets a lift home from his son, where he waits to be picked up again an hour later. The family celebrate Eid at Samir's eldest daughter's house. During the celebration, Samir reveals his decision to travel to Pakistan for a few months. He tells them he wants to visit places from his past and reconnect with old friends and family but does not mention his desire to escape his life in England On his arrival in Lahore, Samir does not experience the feeling of homecoming he had expected He is horri- fied by the poverty and realises he has become unfamiliar with the life in Pakistan. He visits/his parents" graves and remembers his life's path from being a young Pakistan immigrant in England until his, retirement. He also pays a visit to a family whom his wife used to support, a widowed mother and her three daughters, and witnessing their poverty and generosity, he decides to take over his late wife's role; he is going to support this family in need for the rest of his life. Contrary to his initial plans, he leaves Pakistan after just a week, having realised that his home is in England, where his family lives and he spent most of his adult life, Back home, he arranges for the poor family's continued support, and, keeping only what is necessary to support himself and his children, he moves to an old people's home, where he is happy and enjoys his life. Notes younger generations (no direct immigrants) have better education (=> student at Harvard, sports manager Samir says "his family" which is also the family of his children => implies that they may not have a lot of contact to them and are far more integrated into the UK => would definitely call the UK their home Samir can't identify where he really belongs => Pakistan is his origin but he doesn't feel comfortable there because his parents are dead; his childeren (+) all live in the UK but there he doesn't feel home either speaking English is hard for him and he knows no-one in the UK, whereas in Pakistan he can utilise his mother tongue however in Pakistan he doesn't know a lot of people either because he left early and when he visits the family there's no one of his age and no-one who recognises him both countries are so different UK mostly white people, hardly "brown ones", very high buildings, lowers samir's self esteem Pakistan poor country, same ethnic group example of immigrants who built themselves a new and very good life without having to worry about money BUT they didn't fully arrive mentally in their new country and will forever miss a part of their origin, even though the country they moved to is economically more stable even tough he succeeded in having everything other refugees would dream of, he is empty inside (obviously worsened by his wife's death) but he doesn't feel comfortable at all he wanted to stay in Pakistan for a few months but returned to England much sooner, as he notices there is nothing that makes him happy and he only continued his wife's charitable work and visited parents graves wife is more important to him than children because he keeps savings for Pakistanis Samir unfulfilled lonely hard working and dedicated, ambitious (escaped poverty) good-hearted and loving emotional traditional and religious (praying) Displacement: questions of identity and belonging Samir has spent most of his adult life in England while always maintaining a close link to his country of origin, for example by keeping up Pakistani traditions and annually returning "home" to visit his family and his parents' graves. He has fostered the belief that Pakistan is the place where he truly belongs. Moreover, his wife seems to have been fundamental to his sense of belonging, identity and home. Following her death, Samir is left feeling unmoored He longs for an "escape" from England and wants to reconnect with his origins. He plans to go "home". However, when in Pakistan, he feels displaced in his former home country. His search for a home and his attempt to redefine his identity lead him to the realisation that Pakistan is no longer the place he belongs and that England has become his home. He also discovers a new purpose in life and a new facet of his identity: the desire to help people poorer than himself. Postcolonial experiences The region that is today's Pakistan was under British colonial rule for ninety years and is nowadays a member state of the Commonwealth of Nations. It is due to Pakistan's colonial link with Britain that many Pakistani immigrants have come to the UK to help solve labour shortages and/or improve their personal prospects. The main character of The Escape, Samir, is a first-generation immigrant from Pakistan. The short story is as much the personal story of his search for belonging and identity as it is the story of his family's migration and acculturation Despite having lived in England for most of his adult life, Samir continues to view his country of birth as the place he belongs. However, after the loss of his wife and his brief return to Pakistan, he eventually realises and accepts that the country he migrated to decades previously has become his home. His children and grandchildren, having been born in England, naturally feel at home there, and they do not seem to experience any confusion regarding this. However, due to their upbringing, they have not entirely lost their connection to their origins. They cook and eat Pakistani food, at least on occasion wear traditional Pakistani clothing, and observe Muslim holidays. Because Samir's family have adopted certain British customs and seem to be very

Englisch /

the escape

the escape

S

Swani

93 Followers
 

12/13

Lernzettel

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 Mariam
-
on the other hand, she must have taught her kid what's the right thing to do in such situation because she
tried to do something a

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Mariam - on the other hand, she must have taught her kid what's the right thing to do in such situation because she tried to do something about it, but her mother didn't let her Somali woman example for foreigners who are very powerful courage to really stand up for others is lacking by everyone on the bus because of fear of being 'hated' by be majority of society Narrator political activist (had to flee because of her activism) hypocritical good manners fierce, powerful sheltered by mother clever selfless - selfish lack of interference and confidence kind (pointing out free seats) good-hearted Somali Woman - helpful, good will inferior less powerful when it comes to really acting -mind # actions strong and fierce stubborn not inferior dominant - standing up for herself calm unbothered => firm The escape - Qaisra Shahraz (2009) Summary Samir, the protagonist is 73 years old and from Pakistan living in the UK starts of in the mosque in Longsight where he is praying for his dead wife son dropped him off at the mosque and is supposed to pick him up bumps into old friend Manzoor who invites him to his home but Samir refuses Because he was afraid of old memories and witnessing the intimacy between husband and wife his son is a sports manager he has a house with 5 bedrooms but with his family gone and wife's passing all the joy...

Nichts passendes dabei? Erkunde andere Fachbereiche.

Mit uns zu mehr Spaß am Lernen

Hilfe bei den Hausaufgaben

Mit dem Fragen-Feature hast du die Möglichkeit, jederzeit Fragen zu stellen und Antworten von anderen Schüler:innen zu erhalten.

Gemeinsam lernen

Mit Knowunity erhältest du Lerninhalte von anderen Schüler:innen auf eine moderne und gewohnte Art und Weise, um bestmöglich zu lernen. Schüler:innen teilen ihr Wissen, tauschen sich aus und helfen sich gegenseitig.

Sicher und geprüft

Ob Zusammenfassungen, Übungen oder Lernzettel - Knowunity kuratiert alle Inhalte und schafft eine sichere Lernumgebung zu der Ihr Kind jederzeit Zugang hat.

App herunterladen

Knowunity

Schule. Endlich einfach.

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Alternativer Bildtext:

has gone away seems very lonely and doesn't know what to do within an hour, because later that day his son is picking him up again very special religious day where there's usually a lot of food but there's nothing on his kitchen table, a year ago everyone has been there (kids + daughters and sons-in-law) he eats cornflakes instead of the traditional food his son arrives (let his father eat alone at home => could have accompanied him) family gathered at eldest daughters house grandson makes him smile even though he missen his wife a lot and doesn't know how to cope with the situation => tearing up and no searching for contact with family Samir announces that he wants to go back to Pakistan for a few months to visit his family notices that he called Pakistan home and when he thinks about it he is unsure whether that is the truth three days later he left for Pakistan and is greeted by his family there at the airport visits his parents graves and sobs, notices how strange it would be to be buried on a whole different continent than his parents wife did some charitable work in Pakistan in a village which he visits story reveals that the English capital is not for him as he is very shy and uncomfortable every time he goes out but at the same time he feels uncomfortable in Pakistan as well and the situation is very awkward "Flashback" began a knitwear business when he first came to Manchester he worked his way up to a point where he didn't have to worry about money anymore - "Present" visits the family who his wife financially supported woman cries over death and eventually Samir bursts out into tears as well the family reminds him of how lonely he is back in the UK, living in his big house all alone he offers to keep on supporting them financially in the future leaves their home without being recognised or recognising anyone leaves Pakistan after only a week (i guess.) on the plane he sits next to a man of his age called Ibrahim, they have very similar life's and talk about why they visited their “homeland', turns out they are unsure which one is the homeland in the end Samir says he wants to escape to the UK and to a new home which is an elderly peoples home leaves his five bedroom home to his children and his saving for the family in Pakistan calls the elderly peoples home his home in the very end Short summary The short story The Escape by Qaisra Shahraz, published in 2009, is about Samir, a seventy-three-year old Pakistani man who, after the death of his wife, reassesses his life, searching for a home and a sense of belonging The story starts with Samir praying at the mosque in his old neighbourhood He gets a lift home from his son, where he waits to be picked up again an hour later. The family celebrate Eid at Samir's eldest daughter's house. During the celebration, Samir reveals his decision to travel to Pakistan for a few months. He tells them he wants to visit places from his past and reconnect with old friends and family but does not mention his desire to escape his life in England On his arrival in Lahore, Samir does not experience the feeling of homecoming he had expected He is horri- fied by the poverty and realises he has become unfamiliar with the life in Pakistan. He visits/his parents" graves and remembers his life's path from being a young Pakistan immigrant in England until his, retirement. He also pays a visit to a family whom his wife used to support, a widowed mother and her three daughters, and witnessing their poverty and generosity, he decides to take over his late wife's role; he is going to support this family in need for the rest of his life. Contrary to his initial plans, he leaves Pakistan after just a week, having realised that his home is in England, where his family lives and he spent most of his adult life, Back home, he arranges for the poor family's continued support, and, keeping only what is necessary to support himself and his children, he moves to an old people's home, where he is happy and enjoys his life. Notes younger generations (no direct immigrants) have better education (=> student at Harvard, sports manager Samir says "his family" which is also the family of his children => implies that they may not have a lot of contact to them and are far more integrated into the UK => would definitely call the UK their home Samir can't identify where he really belongs => Pakistan is his origin but he doesn't feel comfortable there because his parents are dead; his childeren (+) all live in the UK but there he doesn't feel home either speaking English is hard for him and he knows no-one in the UK, whereas in Pakistan he can utilise his mother tongue however in Pakistan he doesn't know a lot of people either because he left early and when he visits the family there's no one of his age and no-one who recognises him both countries are so different UK mostly white people, hardly "brown ones", very high buildings, lowers samir's self esteem Pakistan poor country, same ethnic group example of immigrants who built themselves a new and very good life without having to worry about money BUT they didn't fully arrive mentally in their new country and will forever miss a part of their origin, even though the country they moved to is economically more stable even tough he succeeded in having everything other refugees would dream of, he is empty inside (obviously worsened by his wife's death) but he doesn't feel comfortable at all he wanted to stay in Pakistan for a few months but returned to England much sooner, as he notices there is nothing that makes him happy and he only continued his wife's charitable work and visited parents graves wife is more important to him than children because he keeps savings for Pakistanis Samir unfulfilled lonely hard working and dedicated, ambitious (escaped poverty) good-hearted and loving emotional traditional and religious (praying) Displacement: questions of identity and belonging Samir has spent most of his adult life in England while always maintaining a close link to his country of origin, for example by keeping up Pakistani traditions and annually returning "home" to visit his family and his parents' graves. He has fostered the belief that Pakistan is the place where he truly belongs. Moreover, his wife seems to have been fundamental to his sense of belonging, identity and home. Following her death, Samir is left feeling unmoored He longs for an "escape" from England and wants to reconnect with his origins. He plans to go "home". However, when in Pakistan, he feels displaced in his former home country. His search for a home and his attempt to redefine his identity lead him to the realisation that Pakistan is no longer the place he belongs and that England has become his home. He also discovers a new purpose in life and a new facet of his identity: the desire to help people poorer than himself. Postcolonial experiences The region that is today's Pakistan was under British colonial rule for ninety years and is nowadays a member state of the Commonwealth of Nations. It is due to Pakistan's colonial link with Britain that many Pakistani immigrants have come to the UK to help solve labour shortages and/or improve their personal prospects. The main character of The Escape, Samir, is a first-generation immigrant from Pakistan. The short story is as much the personal story of his search for belonging and identity as it is the story of his family's migration and acculturation Despite having lived in England for most of his adult life, Samir continues to view his country of birth as the place he belongs. However, after the loss of his wife and his brief return to Pakistan, he eventually realises and accepts that the country he migrated to decades previously has become his home. His children and grandchildren, having been born in England, naturally feel at home there, and they do not seem to experience any confusion regarding this. However, due to their upbringing, they have not entirely lost their connection to their origins. They cook and eat Pakistani food, at least on occasion wear traditional Pakistani clothing, and observe Muslim holidays. Because Samir's family have adopted certain British customs and seem to be very