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Analysis von einem Ausschnitt von „Dead Poets Society“

13.9.2021

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718
13/13
10/1 EN1
Name:
a) Content
b) Style & Language
GRADE: Ser
Assignments
1st Written Exam in English (Advanced Level)
Please note:
gut
718
13/13
10/1 EN1
Name:
a) Content
b) Style & Language
GRADE: Ser
Assignments
1st Written Exam in English (Advanced Level)
Please note:
gut
718
13/13
10/1 EN1
Name:
a) Content
b) Style & Language
GRADE: Ser
Assignments
1st Written Exam in English (Advanced Level)
Please note:
gut
718
13/13
10/1 EN1
Name:
a) Content
b) Style & Language
GRADE: Ser
Assignments
1st Written Exam in English (Advanced Level)
Please note:
gut
718
13/13
10/1 EN1
Name:
a) Content
b) Style & Language
GRADE: Ser
Assignments
1st Written Exam in English (Advanced Level)
Please note:
gut
718
13/13
10/1 EN1
Name:
a) Content
b) Style & Language
GRADE: Ser
Assignments
1st Written Exam in English (Advanced Level)
Please note:
gut

718 13/13 10/1 EN1 Name: a) Content b) Style & Language GRADE: Ser Assignments 1st Written Exam in English (Advanced Level) Please note: gut 40% 60 % MSS Points: Grade 13 Working aids: Monolingual/Bilingual dictionary Working time: 90 minutes Number of words: 672 words 13 Good luck! Ⓒ 13 Use your own words. Write complete sentences and a coherent text for each assignment. Leave room for comments (on the right and on the left). 1 COMPREHENSION: Summarize the given excerpt. 2 ANALYSIS: Analyze Mr. Keating's character by focusing on his teaching personality and his effect on his students and his colleague. Do not forget to back up your analysis with line numbers. 20/11/2020 x 0,4 x 0,6 Text: Excerpt from: Nancy H. Kleinbaum. Dead Poets Society. Bantam Books: New York, 1989, pp. 37-41. About the excerpt: Mr. Keating is the new English teacher at Welton Academy, a fictional elite private boy's school in Vermont in 1959. The following scene takes place in his poetry class. The following morning John Keating sat in a chair beside his desk. His mood seemed serious and quiet. "Boys," he said as the class bell rang, "open your Pritchard text to page 21 of the introduction. Mr. Perry" he gestured toward Neil - "kindly read aloud the first paragraph of the preface entitled 5 'Understanding Poetry"." The boys found the pages in their text, sat upright, and followed as Neil read: "Understanding Poetry, by Dr. J. Evans...

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Pritchard, PhD. To fully understand poetry, we must first be fluent with its meter¹, rhyme, and figures of speech, then ask two questions: 1) How artfully has the objective of the poem been rendered and 10 2) How important is that objective? Question 1 rates the poem's perfection, question 2 rates its importance. Once these questions have been answered, determining the poem's greatness becomes a relatively simple matter. If the poem's score for perfection is plotted on the horizontal of a graph and its importance is plotted on the vertical, then calculating the total area of the poem yields the measure of its greatness. [...]" 15 Neil stopped, and Keating waited a moment to let the lesson sink in. Then Keating grabbed onto his own throat and screamed horribly. "AHHHHGGGGG!!" he shouted. "Refuse! Garbage! Pus! Rip it out of your books. Go on, rip out the entire page! I want this rubbish in the trash where it belongs!" He grabbed the trash can and dramatically marched down the aisles, pausing for each boy to deposit the ripped page from his book. The whole class laughed and snickered. 20 "Make a clean tear," Keating cautioned. "I want nothing left of it! Dr. J. Evans Pritchard, you are disgraceful!" The laughter grew, and it attracted the attention of the Scottish Latin teacher, Mr. McAllister, across the hall. Alarmed, he pulled open the door and rushed into Keating's room. "What the ... "McAllister said, until he spotted Keating holding the trash can. "Sorry, I didn't think you were here, Mr. Keating." Baffled and embarrassed, he backed out of the room and quietly closed 25 the door. Keating strutted back to the front of the room, put the trash can on the floor and jumped into it. The boys laughed louder. Fire danced in Keating's eyes. He stomped the trash a few times, then stepped out and kicked the can away. "This is battle, boys," he cried. "War! You are souls at a critical juncture. Either you will succumb to the will of academic hoi polloi², and the fruit will die on the vine - or you will triumph as individuals. 30 Have no fear, you will learn what this school wants you to learn in my class; however, if I do my job properly, you will also learn a great deal more. For example, you will learn to savor³ language and words because no matter what anyone tells you, words and ideas have the power to change the world. A moment ago I used the term 'hoi polloi'. Who knows what it means? Come on, Overstreet, you twerp." The class laughed. [...] 35 The teacher paced to the back of the room. "Now Mr. Pitts may argue that nineteenth-century literature has nothing to do with business school or medical school. He thinks we should study our J. Evans Pritchard, learn our rhyme and meter, and quietly go about our business of achieving other ambitions." Pitts smiled and shook his head. Keating slammed his hand on the wall behind him, and the sound reverberated like a drum. The entire 40 class jumped and turned to the rear. "Well," Keating whispered defiantly. "I say - drivel! One reads poetry because he is a member of the human race, and the human race is filled with passion! Medicine, law, banking these are necessary to sustain life. But poetry, romance, love, beauty? These are what we stay alive for!" meter: basic rhythmic structure of a verse or lines in verse hoi polloi (Greek): "the many", here: the crowd (to) savor: to enjoy food or an experience slowly, in order to appreciate it as much as possible twerp (coll.): Blödmann/Heini (ugs.) 5 drivel: nonsense or boring and unnecessary information 1. Englisch Kursanblit The excerpt from "Dead Poets Society written by Nancy H. Kleinbaum in 1989 is about the new English teacher John Keating having his first lesson at Welton Academy, a fictional elite private boy's school in Vermont. in the 1960's "1 20.11.20 In the scene Mr. Keating tells the boys to open their Pritchard text. He calls out one of the students who reads out a paragraph from the book. Out of nowhere he grabs onto his own throat and screame's horribly. The whole class just laughs about it. A latin teacher hears what is going on and decides to rush into Keating's room. Mr. Keating is holding a trash can and the latin it teacher immediately leaves after seeing him like that. He wants to make a statement to the boys by stomping the trash a few times and then kicking away. The boys are obviously entertained by Mr. Keating's way of teaching about poetry. X message 22 The excerpt from "Dead Poets Society written by Nancy H. Kleinbaum in 1989 deals with the new English teacher John Keating having his first lesson at Welton Academy, a fictional elite private boy's school in Vermont. In the following Mr. Keating will be analyzed. One paragraph for each idea! John Keating is described as "serious and quilt" (1. If.), which shows that he is authoritarian and takes his job seriously. He gets straight to the point and starts his introduction with teaching (cf. (. 3) this shows that keating is a determined person. After one of his students reads out a paragraph about poetry (cf.1.6ff.), Mr. Keating "wait(s) a moment to let the lesson sink in " (1.15). This proves that иром Mr. Keating wants his students to reflect on prep what he is teaching. From this it can be concluded that it is important for him that his lessons matter and should ^ ^ A " " р constr. influence the students. When Keating "grab[s] onto his own throat and Scream [s] horribly" (1.15.f.), he is portrayed p as self-confident and fearless because he is willing to surprise his students and at the same time expecting to get laughed on, normally not something one would do on their first day of teaching. He wants the boys to rip out the page of the book they have just read prep and throw it into the trash can (cf. (. 16ff.). this action shows that he would not 015 hesitate to let his opinion be heard, another sign for his self-confidence. Moreover, whole class seems to enjoy the the P Mr. way 0,5 Keating is behaving. Proof for this can be ixplain. found in line 19. Mr. Keating makes a good first impression on his students. With his statement "Make a clean tear [..) I want nothing left of it! Dr.J. Evans Pritchard, you are disgraceful!" (1. 20f.) Mr. Keating is 1 portrayed talkactive and sociable because constr. he enjoys the attention he gets from the students with his statements. The boys like this kind of character trait on teachers. because they are probably not used to teachers being this sympathetic since they attend an elite private school. In addition, Mr. Keating is also well known by his colleagues wiw because after Mr. McAllister "rushe(s) into 105 le is a keating's room" (1.22) because he hears the laughter, Mr. McAllister leaves "baffled and surprised embarrassed" (1. 24). Mr. Keating has a and em- reputation, either a bad one because his why? colleague might be frightened by him, or good one because he is known as funny and sarcastic. Since Mr. Mc Allister leaves and consto calls Mr. Keating by his last name (cf. 1. 24) of they must not be close and he has a of respect towards Mr. Keating. l lot Mr. Keating is strong-willed. Proot for this can be found on line 25 because he P prep ^ continues with his lesson right after Mr. McAllister left. He is also really passionate but in this case also aggressive because he "put[s) the trash can on the floor and jump [s] into it" (1.25), also another sign that he is different from other teachers. when he cries (cf. 1.28), he shows that he is emotional even in his job. By "slamm [ing] his hand on the wall behind him" (1.39) ggressive Keating shows that he is demanding and P 1 wants his students to take his lessons. serious. In the excerpt one can clearly see that Mr. keating talks more than any other characters. In the lesson he only picked out gr, gr one boy to read out (cf. 1.6). This aspect 1 proves that he does not really care about other peoples's opinions. In conclusion, Mr. Keating is different from other teachers. He likes to entertain the class, but he still takes his job as a teacher seriously. He has an impact on his students and his colleagues.