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Klausur The Great Gatsby

27.5.2021

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Klausur Englisch
Unterrichtseinheit: National Identity - National Diversity
Francis Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby
Pflichtaufgabe
Compreh
Klausur Englisch
Unterrichtseinheit: National Identity - National Diversity
Francis Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby
Pflichtaufgabe
Compreh
Klausur Englisch
Unterrichtseinheit: National Identity - National Diversity
Francis Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby
Pflichtaufgabe
Compreh
Klausur Englisch
Unterrichtseinheit: National Identity - National Diversity
Francis Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby
Pflichtaufgabe
Compreh
Klausur Englisch
Unterrichtseinheit: National Identity - National Diversity
Francis Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby
Pflichtaufgabe
Compreh
Klausur Englisch
Unterrichtseinheit: National Identity - National Diversity
Francis Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby
Pflichtaufgabe
Compreh

Klausur Englisch Unterrichtseinheit: National Identity - National Diversity Francis Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby Pflichtaufgabe Comprehension Summarize the given extract of the novel The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzgerald in your own words. Wahlaufgabe Do one of these four turns! Analysis 1. Choose three examples from the novel to illustrate how Fitzgerald makes use of images and/or symbols and analyze them in their context! Comment *** 2. Analyze the point of view and how it affects the story! Write a personal comment on one of the following quotations! 3. Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter tomorrow we will run faster, stretch our arms farther.... And one fine morning-,, 4. They were careless people, Tom and Daisy - they smashed up things and creatures and retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made." ne moral geography The following extract is taken from the last chapter of the novel The Great Gatsby. In the closing pages, Nick, the narrator, turns inward and talks about the situation after Gatsby's death: I see now that this has been a story of the West, after all - Tom and Gatsby, Daisy and Jordan and...

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I, were all Westerners, and perhaps we possessed some deficiency in com- mon which made us subtly unadaptable to Eastern life. Even when the East excited me most, even when I was most keenly aware of its su- s periority to the bored, sprawling, swollen towns behind the Ohio, with their inter- minable inquisitions which spared only the children and the very old - even then it had always for me a quality of distortion. West Egg, especially, still figures in my more fantastic dreams. I see it as a night scene by El Greco: a hundred houses, at once con- ventional and grotesque, crouching under a sullen, overhanging sky and a lustreless 10 moon. In the foreground four solemn men in dress suits are walking along the side- walk with a stretcher on which lies a drunken woman in a white evening dress. Her hand, which dangles over the side, sparkles cold with jewels. Gravely the men turn in at a house - the wrong house. But no one knows the woman's name, and no one cares. 15 After Gatsby's death the East was haunted for me like that, distorted beyond my eyes' power of correction. So when the blue smoke of brittle leaves was in the air and the wind blew the wet laundry stiff on the line I decided to come back home. One afternoon late in October I saw Tom Buchanan. He was walking ahead of me along 20 Fifth Avenue in his alert, aggressive way, his hands out a little from his body as if to fight off interference, his head moving sharply here and there, adapting itself to his restless eyes. Just as I slowed up to avoid overtaking him he stopped and began frown- ing into the windows of a jewellery store. Suddenly he saw me and walked back holding his hand. 25 'What's the matter, Nick? Do you object to shaking hands with me?' 'Yes. You know what I think of you.' 'You're crazy, Nick,' he said quickly. 'Crazy as hell. I don't know what's the matter with you.' 'Tom,' I inquired, 'what did you say to Wilson that afternoon?' 30 He stared at me without a word, and I knew I had guessed right about those missing hours. I started to turn away, but he took a step after me and grabbed my arm. sprawling spread out in a disorganized way over a large area interminable endless. inquisition investigation to discover any unusual or immoral behaviour or beliefs distortion being twisted out of shape El Greco (1541-1616) Greek painter, used dis- torted figures and a con- trast between bright col- ours and grey to express religious ecstasy lustreless not bright brittle likely to break be- cause of being dry and cold alert watchful 'I told him the truth,' he said. 'He came to the door while we were getting ready to leave, and when I sent down the word that we weren't in he tried to force his way up- stairs. He was crazy enough to kill me if I hadn't told him who owned the car. His hand 35 was on a revolver in his pocket every minute he was in the house - He broke off defi- antly. 'What if I did tell him? That fellow had it coming to him. He threw dust into your eyes just like he did in Daisy's, but he was a tough one. He ran over Myrtle like you'd run over a dog and never even stopped his car.' There was nothing I could say, except the one unutterable fact that it wasn't true. 40 'And if you think I didn't have my share of suffering - look here, when I went to give up that flat and saw that damn box of dog biscuits sitting there on the sideboard, I sat down and cried like a baby. By God it was awful -' I couldn't forgive him or like him, but I saw that what he had done was, to him, en- tirely justified. It was all very careless and confused. They were careless people, Tom 45 and Daisy - they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made ... I shook hands with him; it seemed silly not to, for I felt suddenly as though I were talking to a child. Then he went into the jewellery store to buy a pearl necklace - or empfindlich perhaps only a pair of cuff buttons - rid of my províncial squeamishness for ever. Gerald, F. Scott: The Great Gatsby, Paderborn: Schöningh Verlag 2001, pp. 124-126 defiant showing strong resistance share part, portion cuff button Manschetten- knopf he Great Gatsby Comprehension The given extract of the novel 'The Great Gatsby' by I. Scott Fitzgerald is taken from the last chapter. In these last pages, Nick, the narrator, turns inward and talks about ✓ the situation after Gatsby's death. After the talk with Jordan Baker The first paragraph brings the motif of the geography in Don't The Great Gatsby in a conclusion. He says that his novel interprete is a story of the West, because all of them were ✓ Westeners apart from the fact scenes played in East. East Egg was more exciting for him than West Egg, but in west Egglare his dreams and hopes. He compares West Egg with a night scene by that most of the is there rich drunken woman lies EL Greco, where on the sicle- is was well-elressed and expensive jewels but no about her. He decides to go back because haunted knews and the East ✓ home and to leave the East for him after Gatsby's death. Sees later in October SSM Tom Buchanan again. He as aggressive as has stopped describes himn along the Fifth Avenue. He stoppeded in front of a jawellery store. don't saw Nick and walked to wim. Tom dien't but then he don't understand why Nick differ't want to shaking hands with walk. She one a he cares have he walks is says him. But Nick clearly sated that Tom knows why. Nick asks directly what Tom said to Wilson the afternoon before Wilson shot Gatsby clead. He says that he told him the truth, that Gatsby drove the car and deserves to die because he didn't even stopped the car after driving. Myrtle to death. Nick knows that this isn't the truth but can't tellithim that Daisy was on the driver's seat. Nick can not forgive him and titled him as a careless person. Daisy you. But at the if with Tom and Nick felt as he was talking to a child- ren. From now on they go seperated ways, and his Squeamishness is for ever rid. Analysis 2.- Point of view Nick Carraway is a character in the the TENNIS end he shakes hands Где- on narrator. one novel and narrator. He is a first-person - narrator. Because him what he knows. He of that that he is involved in the story but not in the major conflict, his view is limited. He can't read other minds so we have to trust. describes things in a mix of an objective and subjective way. For example he describes what he thinking in a particular moment:, I drove from the station directly [...] was the first thing that alarmed anyone. But the a unique point of view and has a friendly personality. He star- ted out naive and hopeful about his summer and his his hand he has future in New York. In general, he observes (the) people and tells the readers what he sees. Nick clescribes what im- attention. pressions other have on Gatsby or how he gains attention However, we have to trust him and his judgement as he encourages the reader in the first paragraphs from the first chapter. There he tells us about his background and past. But what first seems as an advantage is more a disadvantage that he has an intense as if. view on Gatsby. He is his neighbor but it is like he admires him as reading in that sentence:.. You're worth the whole damn bunch put together". Or whe he describes his first meet with Gatsby that his smile is rare. But on the other hand the This suggests that now he sees Gatsby more generously than others but previously came across a as an impartial tona O с •ggest advantage for him to be the ideal narrator is that he has proximity to the main characters and access to the intimate details of their life. For example Tom feels so comfortable around Nick that he shares his intimate eletails with him of his private life by inviting Nick to his apartment in New York where he carries his affair with Myrtle. Another advantage of Nick concerns his outside view. As i told he is also objective when he tells: there was a boom of a bass drum [...] above the encholalia of the garden". But there disad- vantages. He is not omniscent as I said at the beginning which comes times obscures Some the aiso more to the point that he some- truth. But we only see the novel through his eyes which makes it tricky to observe Nick himself. Also he is human especially when he is with her with Jordan Baker. His interactions. we get a are the only places where Sense of emotions and vulnerability from Nick. Due Conversations to that we only can when he is present in the hear certain moment so we can't see scenes when he is not Besides he said " I am one of the few (...) ever known". That says that he doesn't always tells. the truth and if someone has to complein that they are honest, they that off often suggests that they not trustworthy. do things that are there. ST Klausurbogen estigt Teil 1 Inhalt Sprachliche Richtigkeit Ausdrucksvermögen/Sprache Sprachliche Richtigkeit Gesamtbewertung Teil 1 Teil 2 Inhalt Sprachliche Richtigkeit Ausdrucksvermögen/Sprache Sprachliche Richtigkeit Gesamtbewertung Teil 2 Gesamtnote 12 12 10 13 13 14 x 50% x 40% x 10% x 40% x 50% x 40% x 10% x 60% 6 4,8 1,0 4,72 6,5 5,2 1,4 7,86 12,58 13 Punkte 25.0521