Lernangebote

Lernangebote

Unternehmen

Shakespearean Sonnets

314

Teilen

Speichern

Melde dich an, um den Inhalt freizuschalten. Es ist kostenlos!

Zugriff auf alle Dokumente

Werde Teil der Community

Verbessere deine Noten

Mit der Anmeldung akzeptierst du die Nutzungsbedingungen und die Datenschutzrichtlinie

Sonnet Analysis
introduction:
The
given sonnet "..." was written by the
English poet
and playwright William Shakespeare and first published
Sonnet Analysis
introduction:
The
given sonnet "..." was written by the
English poet
and playwright William Shakespeare and first published
Sonnet Analysis
introduction:
The
given sonnet "..." was written by the
English poet
and playwright William Shakespeare and first published
Sonnet Analysis
introduction:
The
given sonnet "..." was written by the
English poet
and playwright William Shakespeare and first published
Sonnet Analysis
introduction:
The
given sonnet "..." was written by the
English poet
and playwright William Shakespeare and first published

Ähnliche Inhalte

Know Cartoon Analysis || Checklist ✅ thumbnail

0

Cartoon Analysis || Checklist ✅

Analyze a cartoon

Know Speeches thumbnail

0

Speeches

Class Test :Topic Speeches

2

Mambo Sauce: Characters and Summary

Erfahren Sie mehr über die Charaktere und die Handlung von Mambo Sauce in diesem Artikel.

Know Blog entry | Checklist ✓ thumbnail

0

Blog entry | Checklist ✓

Hier findest du eine ausführliche Checklist für das Schreiben eines Blog Eintrags.

Know Blog entry || Checklist ✅ thumbnail

0

Blog entry || Checklist ✅

Hier findest du eine ausführliche Checklist für das Schreiben eines Blog Eintrags.

Know Englisch LK_Q2  thumbnail

0

Englisch LK_Q2

Mit ein paar Rechtschreibfehlern...sollte ansonsten aber richtig sein! Es geht um: "The civil rights movement" "Black Lives Matter" "American Dream/Nightmare" "Multicultural Britain"

Sonnet Analysis introduction: The given sonnet "..." was written by the English poet and playwright William Shakespeare and first published in 1609 in the Elizabeathan tra. It deals with... → formal analysis: Sonnet meter rhyme scheme structure content, structure, stilistic devices: - Strophenweise mit einander verknüpfen Absatz zwischen Analyse unterschiedlicher Strophen zu content structure: in how far is the content connected to the structure Of the Sonnet ? question solution model ? is there two - new quatrain adds new aspect to the train of thought lauthor's argumentation - conclusion ? summary? (→ last couplet) - an antithesis between the content of stanzas ? (Gegenbehauptung) zu stilistic devices: connection between content and devices? 4 How can the meaning of the content be explained by stilistic devices ? in reader's head → metaphor: creates clear picture comparison creates image' → exclamation: "!" demonstrate a contrast /stress it express importance ⇒enjambement: demonstrate fluency / motion I movement connect verses by missing punctuation → personification: emphasize an image → world field: create atmosphere (positive/negative?) rethorical question: helps to support structure zur Auf- → conclusion: Fazit zum Schwerpunkt gabenstellung. Sonnet analysis Useful phrases • - puts forward uses the argument that - grounds arguments on.. · rejects this by..... - illustrates / supports this by..... refers to... - makes use of... ..is used this the - he - it - in -..to - he stands for symbolizes words... evole associations of... shows.. by repeating... show / demonstrated - has been order to... get States that... -... Used - to stress - to demonstrate ... -... he makes clear his point clear... Since due to create... Furthermore, Moreover, Nevertheless, Therefore to / caused by as a consequence -Thus,... (folglich) - This is why - Taking to that... get Additionally into consideration his message...

Nichts passendes dabei? Erkunde andere Fachbereiche.

Knowunity ist die #1 unter den Bildungs-Apps in fünf europäischen Ländern

Knowunity ist die #1 unter den Bildungs-Apps in fünf europäischen Ländern

Knowunity wurde bei Apple als "Featured Story" ausgezeichnet und hat die App-Store-Charts in der Kategorie Bildung in Deutschland, Italien, Polen, der Schweiz und dem Vereinigten Königreich regelmäßig angeführt. Werde noch heute Mitglied bei Knowunity und hilf Millionen von Schüler:innen auf der ganzen Welt.

Ranked #1 Education App

Laden im

Google Play

Laden im

App Store

Immer noch nicht überzeugt? Schau dir an, was andere Schüler:innen sagen...

iOS User

Ich liebe diese App so sehr, ich benutze sie auch täglich. Ich empfehle Knowunity jedem!! Ich bin damit von einer 4 auf eine 1 gekommen :D

Philipp, iOS User

Die App ist sehr einfach und gut gestaltet. Bis jetzt habe ich immer alles gefunden, was ich gesucht habe :D

Lena, iOS Userin

Ich liebe diese App ❤️, ich benutze sie eigentlich immer, wenn ich lerne.

Alternativer Bildtext:

accross Shakespearean Sonnets - Shakespeare wrote a sequence of 154 sonnets to all of them were published by a publisher in 1609 all of them centre around the theme of human relationships Structure: three quatrains alternating/ cross rhyme meter: a rhyming couplet g เย iambic pentameter → language? thou = thee thine = thee [O] [ou] [4 You you el yours = yours this structure corres- ponds to the line of argumentation devel- loped in the sonnet. → each quatrain adds a new aspect to the line of thought · text for exam: The poem is a typical Shakespearean sonnet, which that means and build it consists of three quatrains (v. 1-12) one couplet (V. 13-14). It is written in iambic parameter (cf.v....), the usual metre of Shakespeare's sonnets. Also the rhyme scheme is constantly up of a cross rhyme (cf. V. 1-12) and only changes to a couple rhyme in the last couplet (cf. V. 13-14). Strict boundaries of this form, the Speaker unfolds his train of thought and offers a clear structure to make his arguments Within the more understandable. Or the thesis of the first quatrain is complemen- an antithesis by in the 2nd/3rd quatrain ted → final couplet; conclusion Couple drawn from Irhyme ments before argu- 'tis= it is know'st = krow it the hath has decease = dying 1. The fair Youth Sonnets Sonnets 1126: They are all addressed to a young man with whom the poet has a deep & loving friendship. - Some are unabashedly homo-erotic - others display a wistful sensuality → first 17 S.: encourage the young man to marry bear be- Obsession begins to grow and sexually orientated ↳ then comes more the 2. The Dark Lady Sonnets Sonnets 127-152: dark = her hair, her facial features/character In sonnet 127, the so-called "dark lady" enters and immediately becomes the object of the poet's desire. Some are unbasenedly misogynistic, full of lin- gering physical detail and explore the consuming destructive power of lust. ↳ When dark lady enters the tone alters, becomes and idealisation gives way more tormented the concrete relationship: Obsessive, rapt, hate-driven ↳dark lady and the fair youth are some 3. The Greek Sonnets 153 and 154: to engaged in sort of sexual dalliance with each other - have no resemblance to the Fair Youth- and Dark Lady- sequence. They stand alone and draw upon the Roman myth of Cupid. → the immortality motif: - it tries to overcome time's destructiveness love stays forever, doesn't change over time - ex: Should poetry stay part of modern School lessons ? Pro -poetry I shakespeare's poetry is part of common/basic knowledge ↳also historical knowledge about language, you learn culture and emotions -everyone can for themselves - you learn how to express yourself poetically/artistically - everyone can interprete some mostly students have to follow thing different: no right or wrong can't be creative by teacher's interpretation and they start thinking them- (explain topic) -question ? → Hauptteil: 1. Firstly I'd like to mention... 2. Furthermore... Contra there is more important know. ledge that needs to vided in school i Portant topics be pro- more im- 3. Another point is... 4. In addition, 5. It should be mentioned... 6. Nevertheless, it should be thought about... 7. Moreover... 8. in rejection of the idea that.... → Examples: → the language is old and not spoken today, it's hard understand to ↳ causes less interest For example / instance... - Let me give you a couple of ex. - Just think of → Conclusion: - with respect to the arguments above... 1 spelling / grammar today is different introduction: -As we all know, it is commonly ↳ more important to learn free speaking skills discussed... selves a lot of bad grades no real need: when you only have an advantage you will study poetry later (but that's only minority) the big → no need to learn it in every language (German, English, Italian French etc.) → other tex+forms are important: reports, letters more → lack of suitability because there is no relation to today's reality argumentations, Q2/LKE "This great stage of fools..." - Shakespeare in the 21st Century Date: Info-Box: The Sonnet Sonnets are poems that consist of fourteen verses and origi- Inally dealt with politics, friendship and love. The first sonnets ever were written at the court of King Friedrich II (1149-1250) in Sicily. Later on, it was the Italian poet Francesco Petrarca (1304-1374), known in English as Petrarch, whose poetry in- fluenced the genre "sonnet" to a great extent. The so-called Petrarchan Sonnet was made up of two quatrains with the rhyme scheme ABBA ABBA and two triplets with the rhyme scheme CDE CDE. Usually, in the quatrains, a thesis was pos- tulated, whereas the triplets contained the anti-thesis. Thus, there was a strict division between the first and the second part of the Petrarchan Sonnet. Petrarch's sonnets all deal with the love of the poet for an idealized woman he cannot win. For this reason, love is irrevocably connected with pain. The poet claims to be torn between hope and despair. In addition, a witty use of language is characteristic of Petrarch's sonnets and has made them famous. Rhetoric devices that are com- monly used by Petrarch in his works are antithesis as well as oxymoron, paradoxes and puns. For example, Petrarch puns on the name of the woman he adores, Laura, using it inter- changeably with l'oro (gold) and l'aura (air). When English authors started to use the sonnet in Elizabethan times, they slightly changed its structure. For this reason, the Elizabethan sonnet is made up of three quatrains (ABAB CDCD EFEF) and a rhyming couplet at the end (GG). Because of its exposed position at the end of the poem, the couplet is either used to sum up everything that was said before or to draw a conclusion. It might also be used to contradict what has been said before in a clever way or to add a surprising new aspect. No matter which of these alternatives an author chooses, the couplets in the Elizabethan Sonnet tend to be pointed and surprising. Conditions of running a theatre today 1. Other forms of entertainment are much more popular than going to the theatre. 2. Theatre seems to be a form of entertainment for people with a good education. 3. Theatres are closed buildings. 4. All spectators have a seat. most people stood during performance Beer was sold; talking with other, spectators is normal performance took place in the after- noon; broad daylight 7. Spotlights are used to draw the audience's atten- no stage-lightning tion to certain actors/objects. no electricity 1 5. The spectators neither drink nor eat during the performance. They are expected to be quiet and to pay attention all the time. 6. During the performance only the stage is lit, the auditorium is dark. 8. There are many technical possibilities to create scenic illusion of various settings. 9. There are actors and actresses. 10. Only complete plays which have been studied by the director at some length are put on stage. 11. Actors have a long-term contract as a member of a permanent company or are hired for at least one year. 12. Theatres perform about 10 different plays in one year. in Shakespeare's days was going to the theatre very fashionable and popular audience = cross section of population, Queen, king, working circular construction with open roof 13. Theatres depend on public money. Without these subsidies they cannot work. 14. Tickets are relatively expensive. class rich costumes, simple stage properties in different settings Boy actors played women's parts dramatist still writing while actors practised. -pressure ! actors fun the theatre owned I managed time repertory system with available were run by group of actors as private business, independent institutions ordinary people could also afford it STATION 12 "My wooden O" - Shakespeare's theatre building 1. Look at the drawing below (sketch of historical Globe building) and study the OHP transparency supplied (cross-section of Globe reconstruction). 2. Read the statements on the next page and write down whether they are right or wrong. If they are wrong, give the correct answer. STATION 12 "My wooden O" - Shakespeare's theatre building Statements The following statements refer to the Globe Theatre as a building. Which statements are right? Which are wrong? For a wrong statement give the correct answer! 1. The Globe is oval in shape. WRONG! It has a circular shape, like an "O" 2. There are four viewing areas for the spectators. The pit Lyard) and ( three galleries (encircle the stage) 3. Access into the theatre is over two staircases to the sides of the building. WRONG! There are also other dookes 4. The roof is made of clay tiles or shingles. WRONG! roof is a reed roof (thatched roof"). made of dry plants 5. The theatre is basically an open air arena which can be covered with a kind of sail if it starts raining. WRONG! it was were covered. open air. Only galleries 6. Spectators in the pit (or: yard) can stand around the stage on three sides. ""thrust stage" →it thrusts into the audience 7. The balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet can be played on a balcony under the stage roof. yes, but it is not in the centre to one side of it 8. The spectators in the galleries sit on single chairs. WRONG! Bof but there were benches 9. In Shakespeare's time smoking in the theatre was allowed during the performance. could also buy Yes, you 10. In Shakespeare's day more people than today attended a theatre performance. The had only Globe Tada y regulations. fire a of the it there. capacity of 3,000 pp + Aspects of Shakespeare's biography 20.08.27 1564 birth and early years.. 1. place of birth: Stratford-upon-Avon, Great Britain 2. His father: John Shakespeare was leather worker. He was also and glover elected to several a municipal offices / mayor of Stratford in 1568. 3. His mother: Mary Shakespeare; bom: Mary Arden 4. Education: attended Edward VI Grammas King School in Stratford (stasted when he was 7 until 14) -educated in Latin prose and poetry - continued by studying the works of the great classical authors and dramatists - missed any form of higher education, because he left school with 14 due to financial issues 1582 marriage and consecutive years: 5. His wife: Anne Hathaway (1556-1623) 6. Children: 3 Susanna (1583-1649) Judith (1585-1962) 5 Hamnet C1585-1996) 1592 establishment in London as an actor & playwright: 7. first evidence: his rival Robert Greens complained called him "an upstart about his success and crow" in a puplication in 1592 15 94 founding member of "The Lord Chamberlain's Men ". 8. they were a company of actors. they performed at the Theatre of Shoreditch and later at the Globe. Their patron was Lord Chamberlain. Shakespease joined in 1594 바이 poems 9. Shakespeare also wrote two narrative. Between 1585 and 1592 and sonnets. many was probably a teacher, or associated writer the law. Apart from being an actor, he was also aa actor he with 1599 "The Globe" Theatre" built: 10. Owner: swned by six (later twelve) most important each of them owned members of the LC's Men. a shose in the property 11. Money / Income: SP didn't got money for writing the plays, but he received money for the performances. 1603 "The Lord Chamberlain's Men" become the King's Mem 12. Reason for name of the пать change: the name of the / its patron. the king became its patron and as charged. Company was In 1603, a consequence the name "1 was 1616 Shakespeare dies: 13. "The First Folio": it is the first complete collection of Shakespeare's plays. It was pub- lished in 1623.