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Shakespeare's Richard III - summary

Shakespeare's Richard III - summary

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Shakespeare's Richard III - summary

 Richard III - summary
Act 1
Scene 1
Richard, Duke of Gloucester, appears to be in a festive mood when he enters the stage, first
singing th

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A short summary of every scene and act. Die grau hinterlegten Name kommen aus dem Hause York, die rot hinterlegten Namen kommen aus dem Hause Lancaster.

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Richard III - summary Act 1 Scene 1 Richard, Duke of Gloucester, appears to be in a festive mood when he enters the stage, first singing the praises of King Edward IV 's (i.e. his brother's) victory and commenting on the effects of victory and peace after times of war, then revealing his secret plans to get rid of his younger brother George, the Duke of Clarence. When he meets Clarence on his way to prison, Richard pretends empathy and optimism. Later, Richard welcomes news about King Edward IV's bad health and plans marry Lady Anne Neville, whose husband (Edward Westminster, Prince of Wales) and father-in-law (King Henry VI) he has killed. Scene 2 Lady Anne Neville, who accompanies the funeral for King Henry VI, is full of hatred for Richard, who has killed both Henry and Henry's son Edward, Lady Anne's husband-to-be. Richard stops the procession and starts wooing Anne, declaring that his deeds were motivated by his lover for her. First, Anne curses him, but gives when Richard puts on a show, claiming that he is ready to die for her. Once sure of Anne's favour, Richard reveals that he has only pretended to be emotionally involved, then starts fashioning his future self. Scene 3 As Queen Elizabeth and her train are discussing King Edward's...

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health, Richard enters ad accuses the queen of treachery, i.e. of betraying him and Clarence while granting favours to her lowly champions, the Woodvilles. The banned Queen Margaret appears and puts curses on all present except Lord Buckingham, predicting and wishing them dreadful fortunes. Richard turns her curses back on her. After Margaret, exposed to the party's scorn, has left, Richard pretends to fell pity and remorse, feigning Christian morals. When Elizabeth and her train are called to the king, Richard discloses his secret plots, finally meeting two murderers that he instructs to kill Clarence at the Tower. Scene 4 Troubled a guilty conscience, the imprisoned Clarence tells his guard about his nightmare of drowning and going to hell, asking for company while he sleeps. The two murderers sent by Richard enter and, by means of their warrant, dismiss the Lieutenant in charge. When Clarence begs for his life, he learns about Richard's murderous plot. At last, the first murderer kills Clarence, while the second murderer thoroughly regrets the deed and leaves without payment. Act 2 Scene 1 In front of the sick King Edward IV, Richard's brother, the rivalling court factions sanctimoniously (scheinheilig) swear that they will be friends from then on. Richard joins in, but when Queen Elizabeth mentions his brother Clarence, Richard pretends to feel taunted, revealing the news of Clarence's death. The king is devastated, while Richard insinuates that the Queen and her relatives are responsible for that. Scene 2 The Duchess of York, Richard's mother, tries to hide the truth about Clarence's death from his children and raises doubts about Richard's benevolence. When Queen Elizabeth enters, mourning King Edward's death, the Duchess of York claims that her own suffering exceeds everybody's else's. Lord Rivers calls for the crowning of of Edward's young son, Edward V, who is to be brought to court immediately. In private conversation with Richard, Buckingham refers to a secret plot concerning the young prince and the factions at court. Scene 3 Three citizens discuss the political situation after King Edward's death, anxiously hoping for good government, yet expressing mistrust of Richard. Scene 4 Waiting for the young king, Edward V, to arrive, the Duchess of York and the young Duke of York, Edward IV's second son, mock Richard, when a messenger reports that Queen Elizabeth's supporters at court have been imprisoned by Richard and Buckingham. Both the duchess and the queen are shocked and distresses. The archbishop urges Queen Elizabeth and the young duke to flee to Westminster Abbey, a safe place. Act3 Scene 1 On his arrival in London, young Prince Edward is welcomed by his uncle Richard, Lord Buckingham and other noblemen, but not by his mother and his brother, who have taken sanctuary. Buckingham persuades the Lords Cardinal Bourchier and Hastings to bring young Duke of York to his brother Edward. In a conversation about fame, life and death, Prince Edward proves to be outstandingly intelligent and mature for boy his age. Together with his younger brother, he wittily mocks his uncle Richard, whose answers convey threatening overtones. At Richard's request, the two boys reluctantly agree to go to the Tower. Buckingham, Richard and Catesby discuss which of the noblemen could be won over to support Richard's secret plot. Catesby is sent to find out about Hastings' position, and Richard promises Buckingham a generous reward. Scene 2 A nightly messenger tells Lord Hastings about the Earl of Derby's dark premonitions, worrying about Richard's cruel nature, but Hastings refuses to flee. When Catesby examines Hastings' attitude towards Richard, the latter reveals that he does not support Richard's wish to become king. Hastings ridicules the Earl of Derby's fears and convinces him to go with him to the Tower. Delighted at the prospect of his opponents' punishment, Hastings light-heartedly talks to passers- by, yet Buckingham insinuates that Hastings himself is going to die soon. Scene 3 On the way to their execution, Rivers, Grey and Vaughan calmly reflect on the injustice of their fate, remembering Queen Margaret's curse, before they bid each other farewell. Scene 4 The council preparing the coronation of Edward V meets at the Tower. Buckingham lures Hastings into believing that he was in favour with Richard. However, when Richard learns that Hastings still does not support his plans, he accuses Queen Elizabeth and Mrs Shore of witchcraft and calls Hastings a traitor, ordering his execution. Scene 5 Richard and Buckingham pretend they are defending the realm against imminent danger in order to convince the Lord Mayor of their good intentions. When Ratcliffe and Lovell produce Hastings' head, Richard feigns disappointed affection and sympathy. The mayor is easily persuades of Hastings' guilt and agrees to defend Richard's and Buckingham's actions in public. Richard tells Buckingham to spread rumours about his dead brother Edward's moral shortcomings and his illegitimacy (bastardy), while he seeks the support of the clergy (Klerus) and plans to isolate his nephews in the Tower. Scene 6 A scribe reflects on the obvious injustice done to Hastings. Scene 7 Buckingham reports on his speech defaming Edward IV and the late king's children while endorsing Richard as the rightful heir to the throne, but admits that only reluctantly did London citizens react to his words. In order to convince the Mayor of London of Richard's qualities as ruler, Buckingham and Richard put on a sanctimonious show, representing Richard as a pious man at prayer who is unwilling to seize political power. At the urgent request of the mayor and the citizens, led on by Buckingham's clever rhetoric, Richard finally accepts the crown, still denying any will to power. Act 4 Scene 1 When the Duchess of York, Queen Elizabeth and Lady Anne, now married to Richard, want to pay the princes in the Tower a visit, they are hindered by Brakenbury, who acts on Richard's introductions. Derby summons Anne to Richard's imminent coronation, which cause immense distress among the noblewomen. Dorset is urged to go to France, while the women, fearing the worst and lamenting their miseries, have to leave the young princes behind. Scene 2 As soon as Richard ascends the throne, he is consumed by doubt and mistrust, planning to have his nephews killed. Buckingham remains conspicuously evasive (auffällig ausweichend) about the king's request, and Richard hires an assassin to murder the young princes. When Richard learns about Dorset's flight to Richmond, Richard preparers to get rid of Anne and marry his niece instead in order to secure his kingship. In a threatening tone, he admonishes Derby to prevent his wife from communicating with Richmond, her son. Worried about a prophecy that foretold that Richmond would be king, Richard denies Buckingham his reward. Buckingham, aware of Richard's suspicion, takes to flight. Scene 3 Tyrell reports that the young princes have been killed, remarking on the hired murderer's guilty conscience. Richard promises to reward him generously. When the kind considers the success of his plans so far and devises new strategies, Ratcliffe enters and informs him that the Bishop of Ely has joined Richmond, while Buckingham has started military manoeuvres. Richard decides to take up arms without hesitation. Scene 4 Old Queen Margaret, satisfied with her enemies' miseries, joins the Duchess of York and Queen Elizabeth in bewailing their respective losses. Margaret blames the duchess for having given birth to Richard and recalls her contempt for Elizabeth, who wants to be taught how to curse. When Richard enters in arms, his mother confronts him, citing all his previous faults and cursing his military expedition. Elizabeth accuses Richard of the murder of her sons, yet still the King reveals his plans to marry young Elizabeth, the queen's daughter. Feigning honest affection, Richard pledges to make up for the queen's loss by having children with her daughter. Ratcliffe and Catesby inform the king about the arrival of Richmond's fleet. Richard nervously sends for potential allies, expressing mistrust on behalf of the Earl of Derby, whose son he threatens to kill in the case of betrayal. In between news of the enemy's increasing strength, a messenger reports that the Duke of Buckingham has been arrested. In defence of the crown, Richard and his army march towards Salisbury. Scene 5 Speaking in private, the Earl Derby tells Sir Christopher Urswick that he cannot openly support Richmond because his son is being held captive, yet signifies that Richmond may marry young Elizabeth. Sir Christopher relates that several renowned gentlemen have joined Richmond's army in Wales, ready to march against Richard. Act 5 Scene 1 On his way to execution, Buckingham reflects on his guilt and his deserved punishment for trusting Richard and his malicious joy for the promised execution of his enemies, while recalling Margaret's warning. Scene 2 Richmond and his allies discuss the chances and risks of their military expedition, expressing confidence and expecting Richard's followers to switch sides. Scene 3 Richard and his faction discuss their military advantages and prepare for the battle. Scene 4 On the eve of the battle, Richmond discusses his military tactics and Richard has his armour, horse and weapons prepared. The Earl of Derby, whom Richard mistrusts, pays a nightly visit to Richmond's tent and pledges to support the latter. While they are sleeping, both Richmond and Richard are haunted by the ghosts of Richard's victims. The ghost encourage Richmond and wish him well, whereas they curse Richard and wish for his death. When Richard awakes, he nervously reflects on his fears and conscience. Richmond, on the other hand, is in high spirits because of his dream. He deliveres a motivational speech to his soldiers, proclaiming that God is on their side and that their cause is just. Scene 5 Richard seeks assurance by asking his officers about Richmond's potential weakness. Despite being anxious about the outcome of the battle, he discusses his military strategies and calls for a fearless fight. In his speech to his army, the king refers to the alleged (angebliche) unworthiness of the enemies, their low social status and portrays them as thieves, rapists and murderers. Scene 6 On the battlefield, Richard keeps on fighting bravely although his horse has been killed. Scene 7 Richmond kills Richard in battle and receives the crown. He announces his marriage with Elizabeth of York, King Edward IV's daughter, and declares the Wars of Roses at an end, praying for lasting peace.

Englisch /

Shakespeare's Richard III - summary

Shakespeare's Richard III - summary

user profile picture

Patrizia

47 Followers
 

Englisch

 

12

Lernzettel

Shakespeare's Richard III - summary

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 Richard III - summary
Act 1
Scene 1
Richard, Duke of Gloucester, appears to be in a festive mood when he enters the stage, first
singing th

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106

Kommentare (2)

O

Vielen Dank, wirklich hilfreich für mich, da wir gerade genau das Thema in der Schule haben 😁

A short summary of every scene and act. Die grau hinterlegten Name kommen aus dem Hause York, die rot hinterlegten Namen kommen aus dem Hause Lancaster.

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Richard III - summary Act 1 Scene 1 Richard, Duke of Gloucester, appears to be in a festive mood when he enters the stage, first singing the praises of King Edward IV 's (i.e. his brother's) victory and commenting on the effects of victory and peace after times of war, then revealing his secret plans to get rid of his younger brother George, the Duke of Clarence. When he meets Clarence on his way to prison, Richard pretends empathy and optimism. Later, Richard welcomes news about King Edward IV's bad health and plans marry Lady Anne Neville, whose husband (Edward Westminster, Prince of Wales) and father-in-law (King Henry VI) he has killed. Scene 2 Lady Anne Neville, who accompanies the funeral for King Henry VI, is full of hatred for Richard, who has killed both Henry and Henry's son Edward, Lady Anne's husband-to-be. Richard stops the procession and starts wooing Anne, declaring that his deeds were motivated by his lover for her. First, Anne curses him, but gives when Richard puts on a show, claiming that he is ready to die for her. Once sure of Anne's favour, Richard reveals that he has only pretended to be emotionally involved, then starts fashioning his future self. Scene 3 As Queen Elizabeth and her train are discussing King Edward's...

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health, Richard enters ad accuses the queen of treachery, i.e. of betraying him and Clarence while granting favours to her lowly champions, the Woodvilles. The banned Queen Margaret appears and puts curses on all present except Lord Buckingham, predicting and wishing them dreadful fortunes. Richard turns her curses back on her. After Margaret, exposed to the party's scorn, has left, Richard pretends to fell pity and remorse, feigning Christian morals. When Elizabeth and her train are called to the king, Richard discloses his secret plots, finally meeting two murderers that he instructs to kill Clarence at the Tower. Scene 4 Troubled a guilty conscience, the imprisoned Clarence tells his guard about his nightmare of drowning and going to hell, asking for company while he sleeps. The two murderers sent by Richard enter and, by means of their warrant, dismiss the Lieutenant in charge. When Clarence begs for his life, he learns about Richard's murderous plot. At last, the first murderer kills Clarence, while the second murderer thoroughly regrets the deed and leaves without payment. Act 2 Scene 1 In front of the sick King Edward IV, Richard's brother, the rivalling court factions sanctimoniously (scheinheilig) swear that they will be friends from then on. Richard joins in, but when Queen Elizabeth mentions his brother Clarence, Richard pretends to feel taunted, revealing the news of Clarence's death. The king is devastated, while Richard insinuates that the Queen and her relatives are responsible for that. Scene 2 The Duchess of York, Richard's mother, tries to hide the truth about Clarence's death from his children and raises doubts about Richard's benevolence. When Queen Elizabeth enters, mourning King Edward's death, the Duchess of York claims that her own suffering exceeds everybody's else's. Lord Rivers calls for the crowning of of Edward's young son, Edward V, who is to be brought to court immediately. In private conversation with Richard, Buckingham refers to a secret plot concerning the young prince and the factions at court. Scene 3 Three citizens discuss the political situation after King Edward's death, anxiously hoping for good government, yet expressing mistrust of Richard. Scene 4 Waiting for the young king, Edward V, to arrive, the Duchess of York and the young Duke of York, Edward IV's second son, mock Richard, when a messenger reports that Queen Elizabeth's supporters at court have been imprisoned by Richard and Buckingham. Both the duchess and the queen are shocked and distresses. The archbishop urges Queen Elizabeth and the young duke to flee to Westminster Abbey, a safe place. Act3 Scene 1 On his arrival in London, young Prince Edward is welcomed by his uncle Richard, Lord Buckingham and other noblemen, but not by his mother and his brother, who have taken sanctuary. Buckingham persuades the Lords Cardinal Bourchier and Hastings to bring young Duke of York to his brother Edward. In a conversation about fame, life and death, Prince Edward proves to be outstandingly intelligent and mature for boy his age. Together with his younger brother, he wittily mocks his uncle Richard, whose answers convey threatening overtones. At Richard's request, the two boys reluctantly agree to go to the Tower. Buckingham, Richard and Catesby discuss which of the noblemen could be won over to support Richard's secret plot. Catesby is sent to find out about Hastings' position, and Richard promises Buckingham a generous reward. Scene 2 A nightly messenger tells Lord Hastings about the Earl of Derby's dark premonitions, worrying about Richard's cruel nature, but Hastings refuses to flee. When Catesby examines Hastings' attitude towards Richard, the latter reveals that he does not support Richard's wish to become king. Hastings ridicules the Earl of Derby's fears and convinces him to go with him to the Tower. Delighted at the prospect of his opponents' punishment, Hastings light-heartedly talks to passers- by, yet Buckingham insinuates that Hastings himself is going to die soon. Scene 3 On the way to their execution, Rivers, Grey and Vaughan calmly reflect on the injustice of their fate, remembering Queen Margaret's curse, before they bid each other farewell. Scene 4 The council preparing the coronation of Edward V meets at the Tower. Buckingham lures Hastings into believing that he was in favour with Richard. However, when Richard learns that Hastings still does not support his plans, he accuses Queen Elizabeth and Mrs Shore of witchcraft and calls Hastings a traitor, ordering his execution. Scene 5 Richard and Buckingham pretend they are defending the realm against imminent danger in order to convince the Lord Mayor of their good intentions. When Ratcliffe and Lovell produce Hastings' head, Richard feigns disappointed affection and sympathy. The mayor is easily persuades of Hastings' guilt and agrees to defend Richard's and Buckingham's actions in public. Richard tells Buckingham to spread rumours about his dead brother Edward's moral shortcomings and his illegitimacy (bastardy), while he seeks the support of the clergy (Klerus) and plans to isolate his nephews in the Tower. Scene 6 A scribe reflects on the obvious injustice done to Hastings. Scene 7 Buckingham reports on his speech defaming Edward IV and the late king's children while endorsing Richard as the rightful heir to the throne, but admits that only reluctantly did London citizens react to his words. In order to convince the Mayor of London of Richard's qualities as ruler, Buckingham and Richard put on a sanctimonious show, representing Richard as a pious man at prayer who is unwilling to seize political power. At the urgent request of the mayor and the citizens, led on by Buckingham's clever rhetoric, Richard finally accepts the crown, still denying any will to power. Act 4 Scene 1 When the Duchess of York, Queen Elizabeth and Lady Anne, now married to Richard, want to pay the princes in the Tower a visit, they are hindered by Brakenbury, who acts on Richard's introductions. Derby summons Anne to Richard's imminent coronation, which cause immense distress among the noblewomen. Dorset is urged to go to France, while the women, fearing the worst and lamenting their miseries, have to leave the young princes behind. Scene 2 As soon as Richard ascends the throne, he is consumed by doubt and mistrust, planning to have his nephews killed. Buckingham remains conspicuously evasive (auffällig ausweichend) about the king's request, and Richard hires an assassin to murder the young princes. When Richard learns about Dorset's flight to Richmond, Richard preparers to get rid of Anne and marry his niece instead in order to secure his kingship. In a threatening tone, he admonishes Derby to prevent his wife from communicating with Richmond, her son. Worried about a prophecy that foretold that Richmond would be king, Richard denies Buckingham his reward. Buckingham, aware of Richard's suspicion, takes to flight. Scene 3 Tyrell reports that the young princes have been killed, remarking on the hired murderer's guilty conscience. Richard promises to reward him generously. When the kind considers the success of his plans so far and devises new strategies, Ratcliffe enters and informs him that the Bishop of Ely has joined Richmond, while Buckingham has started military manoeuvres. Richard decides to take up arms without hesitation. Scene 4 Old Queen Margaret, satisfied with her enemies' miseries, joins the Duchess of York and Queen Elizabeth in bewailing their respective losses. Margaret blames the duchess for having given birth to Richard and recalls her contempt for Elizabeth, who wants to be taught how to curse. When Richard enters in arms, his mother confronts him, citing all his previous faults and cursing his military expedition. Elizabeth accuses Richard of the murder of her sons, yet still the King reveals his plans to marry young Elizabeth, the queen's daughter. Feigning honest affection, Richard pledges to make up for the queen's loss by having children with her daughter. Ratcliffe and Catesby inform the king about the arrival of Richmond's fleet. Richard nervously sends for potential allies, expressing mistrust on behalf of the Earl of Derby, whose son he threatens to kill in the case of betrayal. In between news of the enemy's increasing strength, a messenger reports that the Duke of Buckingham has been arrested. In defence of the crown, Richard and his army march towards Salisbury. Scene 5 Speaking in private, the Earl Derby tells Sir Christopher Urswick that he cannot openly support Richmond because his son is being held captive, yet signifies that Richmond may marry young Elizabeth. Sir Christopher relates that several renowned gentlemen have joined Richmond's army in Wales, ready to march against Richard. Act 5 Scene 1 On his way to execution, Buckingham reflects on his guilt and his deserved punishment for trusting Richard and his malicious joy for the promised execution of his enemies, while recalling Margaret's warning. Scene 2 Richmond and his allies discuss the chances and risks of their military expedition, expressing confidence and expecting Richard's followers to switch sides. Scene 3 Richard and his faction discuss their military advantages and prepare for the battle. Scene 4 On the eve of the battle, Richmond discusses his military tactics and Richard has his armour, horse and weapons prepared. The Earl of Derby, whom Richard mistrusts, pays a nightly visit to Richmond's tent and pledges to support the latter. While they are sleeping, both Richmond and Richard are haunted by the ghosts of Richard's victims. The ghost encourage Richmond and wish him well, whereas they curse Richard and wish for his death. When Richard awakes, he nervously reflects on his fears and conscience. Richmond, on the other hand, is in high spirits because of his dream. He deliveres a motivational speech to his soldiers, proclaiming that God is on their side and that their cause is just. Scene 5 Richard seeks assurance by asking his officers about Richmond's potential weakness. Despite being anxious about the outcome of the battle, he discusses his military strategies and calls for a fearless fight. In his speech to his army, the king refers to the alleged (angebliche) unworthiness of the enemies, their low social status and portrays them as thieves, rapists and murderers. Scene 6 On the battlefield, Richard keeps on fighting bravely although his horse has been killed. Scene 7 Richmond kills Richard in battle and receives the crown. He announces his marriage with Elizabeth of York, King Edward IV's daughter, and declares the Wars of Roses at an end, praying for lasting peace.