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Loose change

Loose change

 What is it that us human?
The novel poses this question: Frankenstein's creature is an artificial being, created in a laboratory. He consis

Loose change

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What is it that us human? The novel poses this question: Frankenstein's creature is an artificial being, created in a laboratory. He consists of human parts, but looks deformed, monstrous. On the other hand, he clearly experiences human emotions. For example, he feels pain, sympathy, sadness, anger, curiosity, tenderness, and longing. Then again, his behaviour towards Frankenstein and his other victims is described as inhumanly ruthless, cruel, and brutal. The creature is also depicted as possessing "superhuman speed", an immunity to cold, and incredible strength and endurance. Has Frankenstein succeeded or failed? The creature is undoubtedly alive, but is it human? When the scientist infuses the lifeless thing" with life, he immediately feels repulsed, even though his intention was to create a beautiful being and he had selected the parts with that purpose in mind This suggests that something is missing, that having the "parts" of a creature and the power to instil life is still not enough to "make" a human being This might be a nod towards spirituality; Shelley may be emphasising that while Frankenstein is able to create a living being, his creature lacks something vital that, perhaps, only God could provide. In contrast to this interpretation, the reader is constantly confronted with the creature's human traits. He has a strong...

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desire to understand the world around him, and so he learns to speak and to read, e delights in nature: He has an intense neer for human affection in fact, he is defined by his desire, for connection and suffers terribly from his loneliness, his lack of belonging, his exclusion from society. For example, ne desperately wants the De Laceys to like him and to be their friend, which is why he collects and chops their firewood When he finally becomes aware of his own deformity and realises his inescapable otherness, he pleads for the creation of someone else who is like him, a female companion. Does this make him human? Or could it be his reaction to isolation, rejection, and cruelty? it has been put forward that it is not the creature who behaves like a monster but the people he encounters, who show him no kindness. He is abandoned by his creator, shot at for saving a drowning girl, mistreated, hurt, insulted, shunned, and hunted wherever he goes. It could be said that this made him what he is. if may be his reaction to these acts - his lashing out and seeking revenge- that is his ultimate human characteristic. The novel asks "What is it that makes us human?". Our ability to empathise? Our desire to belong? Our need to learn and understand? Our fear of the unknown, the strange? Our cruelty? It is up to the reader to find his or her own answer. Loose change - Andrea Levy (2005) Summary all-day meeting between two women both with foreign background one of them has already established her life in the city, the other one hasn't (just arrived as a political refugee from Uzbekistan) takes place in the bathroom of an art gallery (London) -woman with established life needs coins for tampon machine and wants to give the money back to the refugee (Laylor) protagonist invites her for a cup of tea in a cafe -protagonist assumes woman is refugee from Spain because of the accent brother of Laylor shows up, they have a short discussion -> in her native language turns out they're homeless suddenly protagonists view on girl changes dramatically "dirty fingernails, ugly tooth gap" protagonist wonders why refugee approached her as she has a lot on her plate and others could offer their help just leaves the cafe and the girl behind Short summary The short story Loose Change, written by Andrea Levy and published in 2005, tells a story of prejudices against immigrants and illustrates that generosity does not depend on wealth. The story is told by an unnamed female first-person narrator. The narrator meets Laylor during a visit to the toilets at the National Portrait Gallery in London Uncomfortable and in need of change for a vending machine for hygiene products (the "tampon machine"), the narrator meets the generous Laylor, who helps her out without expecting to be paid back. After deliberately looking for her, the narrator walks with Laylor through the gallery, commenting on different pictures, before she starts to feel uncomfortable with Laylor's exuberant youth. They head for the cafeteria and the narrator learns about the precarious living situation Laylor and her brother are in: as refugees from Uzbekistan, Laylor and her brother don't know anyone in London. They don't have much money, so they are sleeping rough. Even though Laylor does not ask for anything, the narrator feels pressured / shamed into helping her. However, while thinking about the advantages that helping Laylor could bring, the narrator unexpectedly leaves the gallery without further comment. Notes protagonist may not want to be confronted with emigration as she sees herself as a Londoner doesn't care about grandmothers background and what challenges she faced because of people like her behaves the same way which she criticises when she says "all Londoners I assume" over generations, the emigrational background is being more and more disregarded Laylor generous and selfless (even tho she hasn't got a lot of money either; doesn't expect something in return) good-hearted, pure easily trusts people (thus maybe naive) despite the fact that she is homeless and poor, she is very unbothered and seems happy talkative, open-minded grateful and humble (doesn't complain about her situation) Protagonist inner conflict (in regard to origin) narrow-minded easy to influence (by looks) naive, one-dimensional trying to shift the responsibility deflecting blame unsociable (doesn't want to make friends) sees herself as the victim also polite and responsible (automatically wants to give her money back) Displacement: questions of Identity and belonging The nameless narrator, whose grandmother immigrated to the UK from the Caribbean, is keen on blending in, priding herself on her stereotypical behaviour. Influenced by her now xenophobic grandmother, she seems to neither fully accept her cultural background nor to feel entirely accepted as a British native. Giving up on part of her heritage culture and not being able to fully embrace her identity as a bicultural Londoner leaves her without a "Heimat" The narrator's insecurity stands in stark contrast to the settled and strong character of Laylor, a young illegal immigrant who was forced to leave her home Country. Her strength seems to be based on her self knowledge and her complete acceptance of her family's background This is what provides her with a sense of belonging Both characters' attitudes illustrate the importance of belonging when it comes to identity. The narrator, who seems to lack a true sense of belonging, appears to also lack a proper sense of self. Her anxiousness and lacking self-confidence hint at an identity struggle. Laylor's difficulties, on the other hand, are not at all linked to her identity. Although she experiences displacement, she nevertheless appears confident and strong. Her sense of belonging seems to underpin her identity. Postcolonial experience The female first-person narrator lives in the UK, formerly one of the major colonial powers, and is a descendant of a first-generation immigrant from the Caribbean, potentially from a region once under British rule. Despite having been an immigrant herself, the narrator's grandmother has become xenophobic over the years, perhaps in an attempt to set herself apart from more recent immigrants and to stress her own belonging to Britain. The narrator is similarly prone to overcompensation. She takes pride in behaving like a stereotypical Londoner, that is, being aloof and unapproachable. When she gets to know Laylor, an immigrant from Uzbekistan, she realises that she has the power to help Laylor, but, ironically, decides against it. In the end, it may have been her stereotypical London aloofness that led her to leave the girl to her own devices. The short story is moreover linked to postcolonialism by the themes of identity and belonging. Despite her precarious situation, Laylor seems empowered by her sense of belonging The narrator, in contrast, is weakened by her lack of it. She appears to lose her humanity in the end, defeated by her continuing struggle to belong The third and final continent - Jhumpa Lahiri (1999) Summary in 1964, an Indian man leaves native country to sail to London - studies at London School of Economics - - shares apartment with other Bengalis 5 years later => age 36, gets job offer from a library in Massachusetts same time, marriage was arranged by family => flies back to Calcutta and then onwards to Boston guidebook says that Americans are less friendly than British people first meals are cornflakes => on a budget, spending little money until wife arrives comes across an ad for a free room to rent but is told they only let boys from Harvard or Tech in still makes appointment for next day would be first house without other Indians woman who owns house is old and named Mrs Croft one becomes aware of the fact that his mother has passed away they have a conversation despite the fact that he ist not a Harvard or Tech student he moves into the apartment, no girls allowed tho awaits his wife Mala who is waiting for her green card old woman wants narrator to sit next to her on piano bench => becomes routine - Helen (Mrs Croft's daughter) tells him that he is the first boarder her mother has called a gentleman moves out of the apartment and says goodbye to Mrs Croft -Mala arrives and narrator picks her up at the airport they speak Bengali (his first time in America) however, they talk little and the situation is awkward one day they want to go out and Mala puts on her Sari => narrator feels uncomfortable as she seems to be overdressed they go out at night and visit Mrs Croft Mala and Mrs Croft have a connection and get along very well Mrs Croft dies a month later and Mala consoles him story continues and they have a son who attends Harvard

Englisch /

Loose change

Loose change

S

Swani

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12/13

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 What is it that us human?
The novel poses this question: Frankenstein's creature is an artificial being, created in a laboratory. He consis

App öffnen

:)

What is it that us human? The novel poses this question: Frankenstein's creature is an artificial being, created in a laboratory. He consists of human parts, but looks deformed, monstrous. On the other hand, he clearly experiences human emotions. For example, he feels pain, sympathy, sadness, anger, curiosity, tenderness, and longing. Then again, his behaviour towards Frankenstein and his other victims is described as inhumanly ruthless, cruel, and brutal. The creature is also depicted as possessing "superhuman speed", an immunity to cold, and incredible strength and endurance. Has Frankenstein succeeded or failed? The creature is undoubtedly alive, but is it human? When the scientist infuses the lifeless thing" with life, he immediately feels repulsed, even though his intention was to create a beautiful being and he had selected the parts with that purpose in mind This suggests that something is missing, that having the "parts" of a creature and the power to instil life is still not enough to "make" a human being This might be a nod towards spirituality; Shelley may be emphasising that while Frankenstein is able to create a living being, his creature lacks something vital that, perhaps, only God could provide. In contrast to this interpretation, the reader is constantly confronted with the creature's human traits. He has a strong...

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desire to understand the world around him, and so he learns to speak and to read, e delights in nature: He has an intense neer for human affection in fact, he is defined by his desire, for connection and suffers terribly from his loneliness, his lack of belonging, his exclusion from society. For example, ne desperately wants the De Laceys to like him and to be their friend, which is why he collects and chops their firewood When he finally becomes aware of his own deformity and realises his inescapable otherness, he pleads for the creation of someone else who is like him, a female companion. Does this make him human? Or could it be his reaction to isolation, rejection, and cruelty? it has been put forward that it is not the creature who behaves like a monster but the people he encounters, who show him no kindness. He is abandoned by his creator, shot at for saving a drowning girl, mistreated, hurt, insulted, shunned, and hunted wherever he goes. It could be said that this made him what he is. if may be his reaction to these acts - his lashing out and seeking revenge- that is his ultimate human characteristic. The novel asks "What is it that makes us human?". Our ability to empathise? Our desire to belong? Our need to learn and understand? Our fear of the unknown, the strange? Our cruelty? It is up to the reader to find his or her own answer. Loose change - Andrea Levy (2005) Summary all-day meeting between two women both with foreign background one of them has already established her life in the city, the other one hasn't (just arrived as a political refugee from Uzbekistan) takes place in the bathroom of an art gallery (London) -woman with established life needs coins for tampon machine and wants to give the money back to the refugee (Laylor) protagonist invites her for a cup of tea in a cafe -protagonist assumes woman is refugee from Spain because of the accent brother of Laylor shows up, they have a short discussion -> in her native language turns out they're homeless suddenly protagonists view on girl changes dramatically "dirty fingernails, ugly tooth gap" protagonist wonders why refugee approached her as she has a lot on her plate and others could offer their help just leaves the cafe and the girl behind Short summary The short story Loose Change, written by Andrea Levy and published in 2005, tells a story of prejudices against immigrants and illustrates that generosity does not depend on wealth. The story is told by an unnamed female first-person narrator. The narrator meets Laylor during a visit to the toilets at the National Portrait Gallery in London Uncomfortable and in need of change for a vending machine for hygiene products (the "tampon machine"), the narrator meets the generous Laylor, who helps her out without expecting to be paid back. After deliberately looking for her, the narrator walks with Laylor through the gallery, commenting on different pictures, before she starts to feel uncomfortable with Laylor's exuberant youth. They head for the cafeteria and the narrator learns about the precarious living situation Laylor and her brother are in: as refugees from Uzbekistan, Laylor and her brother don't know anyone in London. They don't have much money, so they are sleeping rough. Even though Laylor does not ask for anything, the narrator feels pressured / shamed into helping her. However, while thinking about the advantages that helping Laylor could bring, the narrator unexpectedly leaves the gallery without further comment. Notes protagonist may not want to be confronted with emigration as she sees herself as a Londoner doesn't care about grandmothers background and what challenges she faced because of people like her behaves the same way which she criticises when she says "all Londoners I assume" over generations, the emigrational background is being more and more disregarded Laylor generous and selfless (even tho she hasn't got a lot of money either; doesn't expect something in return) good-hearted, pure easily trusts people (thus maybe naive) despite the fact that she is homeless and poor, she is very unbothered and seems happy talkative, open-minded grateful and humble (doesn't complain about her situation) Protagonist inner conflict (in regard to origin) narrow-minded easy to influence (by looks) naive, one-dimensional trying to shift the responsibility deflecting blame unsociable (doesn't want to make friends) sees herself as the victim also polite and responsible (automatically wants to give her money back) Displacement: questions of Identity and belonging The nameless narrator, whose grandmother immigrated to the UK from the Caribbean, is keen on blending in, priding herself on her stereotypical behaviour. Influenced by her now xenophobic grandmother, she seems to neither fully accept her cultural background nor to feel entirely accepted as a British native. Giving up on part of her heritage culture and not being able to fully embrace her identity as a bicultural Londoner leaves her without a "Heimat" The narrator's insecurity stands in stark contrast to the settled and strong character of Laylor, a young illegal immigrant who was forced to leave her home Country. Her strength seems to be based on her self knowledge and her complete acceptance of her family's background This is what provides her with a sense of belonging Both characters' attitudes illustrate the importance of belonging when it comes to identity. The narrator, who seems to lack a true sense of belonging, appears to also lack a proper sense of self. Her anxiousness and lacking self-confidence hint at an identity struggle. Laylor's difficulties, on the other hand, are not at all linked to her identity. Although she experiences displacement, she nevertheless appears confident and strong. Her sense of belonging seems to underpin her identity. Postcolonial experience The female first-person narrator lives in the UK, formerly one of the major colonial powers, and is a descendant of a first-generation immigrant from the Caribbean, potentially from a region once under British rule. Despite having been an immigrant herself, the narrator's grandmother has become xenophobic over the years, perhaps in an attempt to set herself apart from more recent immigrants and to stress her own belonging to Britain. The narrator is similarly prone to overcompensation. She takes pride in behaving like a stereotypical Londoner, that is, being aloof and unapproachable. When she gets to know Laylor, an immigrant from Uzbekistan, she realises that she has the power to help Laylor, but, ironically, decides against it. In the end, it may have been her stereotypical London aloofness that led her to leave the girl to her own devices. The short story is moreover linked to postcolonialism by the themes of identity and belonging. Despite her precarious situation, Laylor seems empowered by her sense of belonging The narrator, in contrast, is weakened by her lack of it. She appears to lose her humanity in the end, defeated by her continuing struggle to belong The third and final continent - Jhumpa Lahiri (1999) Summary in 1964, an Indian man leaves native country to sail to London - studies at London School of Economics - - shares apartment with other Bengalis 5 years later => age 36, gets job offer from a library in Massachusetts same time, marriage was arranged by family => flies back to Calcutta and then onwards to Boston guidebook says that Americans are less friendly than British people first meals are cornflakes => on a budget, spending little money until wife arrives comes across an ad for a free room to rent but is told they only let boys from Harvard or Tech in still makes appointment for next day would be first house without other Indians woman who owns house is old and named Mrs Croft one becomes aware of the fact that his mother has passed away they have a conversation despite the fact that he ist not a Harvard or Tech student he moves into the apartment, no girls allowed tho awaits his wife Mala who is waiting for her green card old woman wants narrator to sit next to her on piano bench => becomes routine - Helen (Mrs Croft's daughter) tells him that he is the first boarder her mother has called a gentleman moves out of the apartment and says goodbye to Mrs Croft -Mala arrives and narrator picks her up at the airport they speak Bengali (his first time in America) however, they talk little and the situation is awkward one day they want to go out and Mala puts on her Sari => narrator feels uncomfortable as she seems to be overdressed they go out at night and visit Mrs Croft Mala and Mrs Croft have a connection and get along very well Mrs Croft dies a month later and Mala consoles him story continues and they have a son who attends Harvard