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stylistic/ rethorical devices

stylistic/ rethorical devices

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kaya

1821 Followers
 

Englisch

 

11/12/10

Lernzettel

stylistic/ rethorical devices

 Use of language
DEVICE
repetition (to repeat)
anaphora
a word or several words are
("When we when we when repeated at the beginning
we ..."

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definition + effect - use of language - argumentative techniques

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Use of language DEVICE repetition (to repeat) anaphora a word or several words are ("When we when we when repeated at the beginning we ...") of successive lines or alliteration ("So soft, so sweet ...”) parallelism / repetition ("I like chocolate, I love chocolate, I crave chocolate.") use of pronouns ("We all agree that ... ") ("We...Our..../ They... Those") drastic/vivid descriptions ("Having seen people jump off the building" "People killing each other with machetes") enumeration (v: to enumerate) ("The problems are caused by our cars, our factories, our ...") ... personification (v: to personify) ("The sun gently touched his face") DEFINITION simile sentences the repetition of the same consonant sound in neighbouring words, usually at the beginning of words the deliberate repetition of similar or identical words, phrases or constructions in neighbouring lines, sentences or paragraphs to involve the listeners/readers to create a feeling of unity or solidarity: speaker presumes/presupposes that listeners/readers support his/her point of view/agree with him/her (it seems unreasonable not to agree with the speaker) to impose your opinion on the reader to create the illusion of a group identity/mutual understanding ("us" against "them") to create a dichotomy (us vs. them) the listing of words or phrases POSSIBLE FUNCTION 1 EFFECT to appeal to ... the emotions rather than to reason the listeners'/readers' conscience to create vivid mental images to stress / put emphasis on / to emphasise / to draw attention to to stress key words / major arguments / important aspects to increase intensity to make lines more memorable a kind of metaphor in which animals, plants, inanimate objects or abstract ideas are represented as...

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if they were human beings and possessed human qualities an explicit comparison between to emphasise / stress sth. to make listeners/readers aware of the extent of the problem increase in intensity to simplify matters by reducing complexity to imply that the abstract unit/ phenomenon can (re)act as one to make things better imaginable to arouse interest ("My love is like a red, red rose.") imagery / image /figurative language a comparison between two things which are basically quite different without using metaphor (for) (adj.: metaphorical) 'like' or 'as'; while a simile ("He is a lion.") (see above) only says that one thing is LIKE another, a metaphor says that one thing IS another symbol (of) (adj: symbolic) ("The dove is the symbol of peace.") irony (adj.: ironic(al)) ("This cold and rainy wheather is really wonderful") sarcasm (adj.: sarcastic) hyperbole / exaggeration (v: to exaggerate; adj.: exaggerated) / overstatement ("I'm so hungry I could eat a horse.") group of three / triple ("It's cruel, unfair and barbaric.") direct address to the listeners / readers ("Would you want to...") antithesis (adj.: antithetical) / contrast two things which are basically quite different using 'like' or 'as' climax (adj.: climactic) a symbol is something concrete (like a person, object, image, word or event) that stands for something abstract or invisible saying the opposite of what you really mean; do NOT use "ironic" in the sense of "funny/humorous" a strong form of verbal irony used to hurt someone through mockery or disapproval An exaggerated statement making things bigger/ smaller/ more important than they actually are. [Sometimes also used to create irony (see above)] aming three aspects that actually belong to one central idea. the contrasting of two opposing words, concepts, ideas... to simplify complicated matters by referring to everyday / known experiences / phenomena to make things more imaginable to arouse interest to simplify to illustrate to make lines more memorable to add colour to voice indirect criticism to launch into a polemic against to be polemic to stress/highlight/ emphasise a fact to produce a humorous effect to make lines more resonant to link ideas together to make them feel involved to appeal to the listeners'/readers' conscience to illustrate developments to illustrate alternatives Steigerung / Verschlimmerung choice of words argumentative techniques DEVICE Comparisons & examples antithesis quoting experts / authorities; referring to statistics / polls / research ("As Dr. X from the Y institute found out...") prolepsis/ refuting counterarguments wenn Autor etw. wiederlegen will reference to God ("God bless America") reference to (our) nation/ reference to history ("As the founding father wrote in the Declaration of independence...") personal narrative ("I experienced what it means to be poor myself" the arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance, often in parallel structure words from a certain word field words with a positive/negative connotation DEFINITION to compare things to each others to exemplify things/ ideas opposition, or contrast of ideas or words in a balanced or parallel construction refuting anticipated objections referring to important events in a nations history telling the audience about one's own life to draw attention to, for example, developments to emphasize the impact of sth. to stress a certain idea to underline a concept to emphasize sth. POSSIBLE FUNCTION EFFECT to make ideas more imaginable to give concrete proof of one's arguments to make one's own arguments more convincing to contrast ideas to provide an opposite example of sth. to back up/support one's arguments to eliminate doubt to appear reliable to the readers/listeners to appear well-informed thus, to establish credibility 1 to refute possible counter-arguments to stress that the aim is righteous to guarantee approval to justify policy to portray a nation as an amalgam of its collective best to refute criticism to gain support to appeal to patriotism to establish a common identity to create the impression of being one of "us" to gain support/ sympathy from the audience Simply claiming things or stating opinions as facts instead of well- balanced arguments ("No one can seriously doubt that global warming is caused by humans.") rhetorical questions ("Do you really believe that ... ?") How to talk about these rhetorical devices... a question to which the answer is obvious and therefore not expected; in reality a statement The speaker uses an anaphora (11. 7 - 10) to stress the idea of..... The alliteration 66 no room left for doubts/questions speaker presumes that listeners/readers agree with him/her (appeal to general knowledge/common sense) to involve (1. 78) makes the concept of....more memorable.... By referring to the Declaration of Independence (1. 56), President Bush makes his cause seem important and stresses freedom as a national principle. The reference to God in line 11 lets X's goal seem righteous. The metaphor used in line 23 makes the ideas of the speech more imaginable. listeners/readers to make them think or question old beliefs to arouse interest/to attract attention

Englisch /

stylistic/ rethorical devices

stylistic/ rethorical devices

user profile picture

kaya

1821 Followers
 

Englisch

 

11/12/10

Lernzettel

stylistic/ rethorical devices

Dieser Inhalt ist nur in der Knowunity App verfügbar.

 Use of language
DEVICE
repetition (to repeat)
anaphora
a word or several words are
("When we when we when repeated at the beginning
we ..."

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Teilen

Speichern

202

Kommentare (1)

T

Cool, mit dem Lernzettel konnte ich mich richtig gut auf meine Klassenarbeit vorbereiten. Danke 👍👍

definition + effect - use of language - argumentative techniques

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Use of language DEVICE repetition (to repeat) anaphora a word or several words are ("When we when we when repeated at the beginning we ...") of successive lines or alliteration ("So soft, so sweet ...”) parallelism / repetition ("I like chocolate, I love chocolate, I crave chocolate.") use of pronouns ("We all agree that ... ") ("We...Our..../ They... Those") drastic/vivid descriptions ("Having seen people jump off the building" "People killing each other with machetes") enumeration (v: to enumerate) ("The problems are caused by our cars, our factories, our ...") ... personification (v: to personify) ("The sun gently touched his face") DEFINITION simile sentences the repetition of the same consonant sound in neighbouring words, usually at the beginning of words the deliberate repetition of similar or identical words, phrases or constructions in neighbouring lines, sentences or paragraphs to involve the listeners/readers to create a feeling of unity or solidarity: speaker presumes/presupposes that listeners/readers support his/her point of view/agree with him/her (it seems unreasonable not to agree with the speaker) to impose your opinion on the reader to create the illusion of a group identity/mutual understanding ("us" against "them") to create a dichotomy (us vs. them) the listing of words or phrases POSSIBLE FUNCTION 1 EFFECT to appeal to ... the emotions rather than to reason the listeners'/readers' conscience to create vivid mental images to stress / put emphasis on / to emphasise / to draw attention to to stress key words / major arguments / important aspects to increase intensity to make lines more memorable a kind of metaphor in which animals, plants, inanimate objects or abstract ideas are represented as...

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Alternativer Bildtext:

if they were human beings and possessed human qualities an explicit comparison between to emphasise / stress sth. to make listeners/readers aware of the extent of the problem increase in intensity to simplify matters by reducing complexity to imply that the abstract unit/ phenomenon can (re)act as one to make things better imaginable to arouse interest ("My love is like a red, red rose.") imagery / image /figurative language a comparison between two things which are basically quite different without using metaphor (for) (adj.: metaphorical) 'like' or 'as'; while a simile ("He is a lion.") (see above) only says that one thing is LIKE another, a metaphor says that one thing IS another symbol (of) (adj: symbolic) ("The dove is the symbol of peace.") irony (adj.: ironic(al)) ("This cold and rainy wheather is really wonderful") sarcasm (adj.: sarcastic) hyperbole / exaggeration (v: to exaggerate; adj.: exaggerated) / overstatement ("I'm so hungry I could eat a horse.") group of three / triple ("It's cruel, unfair and barbaric.") direct address to the listeners / readers ("Would you want to...") antithesis (adj.: antithetical) / contrast two things which are basically quite different using 'like' or 'as' climax (adj.: climactic) a symbol is something concrete (like a person, object, image, word or event) that stands for something abstract or invisible saying the opposite of what you really mean; do NOT use "ironic" in the sense of "funny/humorous" a strong form of verbal irony used to hurt someone through mockery or disapproval An exaggerated statement making things bigger/ smaller/ more important than they actually are. [Sometimes also used to create irony (see above)] aming three aspects that actually belong to one central idea. the contrasting of two opposing words, concepts, ideas... to simplify complicated matters by referring to everyday / known experiences / phenomena to make things more imaginable to arouse interest to simplify to illustrate to make lines more memorable to add colour to voice indirect criticism to launch into a polemic against to be polemic to stress/highlight/ emphasise a fact to produce a humorous effect to make lines more resonant to link ideas together to make them feel involved to appeal to the listeners'/readers' conscience to illustrate developments to illustrate alternatives Steigerung / Verschlimmerung choice of words argumentative techniques DEVICE Comparisons & examples antithesis quoting experts / authorities; referring to statistics / polls / research ("As Dr. X from the Y institute found out...") prolepsis/ refuting counterarguments wenn Autor etw. wiederlegen will reference to God ("God bless America") reference to (our) nation/ reference to history ("As the founding father wrote in the Declaration of independence...") personal narrative ("I experienced what it means to be poor myself" the arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance, often in parallel structure words from a certain word field words with a positive/negative connotation DEFINITION to compare things to each others to exemplify things/ ideas opposition, or contrast of ideas or words in a balanced or parallel construction refuting anticipated objections referring to important events in a nations history telling the audience about one's own life to draw attention to, for example, developments to emphasize the impact of sth. to stress a certain idea to underline a concept to emphasize sth. POSSIBLE FUNCTION EFFECT to make ideas more imaginable to give concrete proof of one's arguments to make one's own arguments more convincing to contrast ideas to provide an opposite example of sth. to back up/support one's arguments to eliminate doubt to appear reliable to the readers/listeners to appear well-informed thus, to establish credibility 1 to refute possible counter-arguments to stress that the aim is righteous to guarantee approval to justify policy to portray a nation as an amalgam of its collective best to refute criticism to gain support to appeal to patriotism to establish a common identity to create the impression of being one of "us" to gain support/ sympathy from the audience Simply claiming things or stating opinions as facts instead of well- balanced arguments ("No one can seriously doubt that global warming is caused by humans.") rhetorical questions ("Do you really believe that ... ?") How to talk about these rhetorical devices... a question to which the answer is obvious and therefore not expected; in reality a statement The speaker uses an anaphora (11. 7 - 10) to stress the idea of..... The alliteration 66 no room left for doubts/questions speaker presumes that listeners/readers agree with him/her (appeal to general knowledge/common sense) to involve (1. 78) makes the concept of....more memorable.... By referring to the Declaration of Independence (1. 56), President Bush makes his cause seem important and stresses freedom as a national principle. The reference to God in line 11 lets X's goal seem righteous. The metaphor used in line 23 makes the ideas of the speech more imaginable. listeners/readers to make them think or question old beliefs to arouse interest/to attract attention